Hopewell Native American Culture
Quatr.us answers questions
Upgrade /Log in
Options /Log out
Print
About
Africa
Egypt
Mesopotamia
Early Europe
Greece
Rome
China
India
Central Asia
Medieval
Islamic Empire
Native Americans
S./Central America
American History
Biology
Chemistry
Geology
Math
Physics
Weather
Food
Judaism
Christianity
Home

Hopewell Culture

Hopewell Mound
Hopewell Mound in Ohio

About 200 BC, people - including the Adena people - formed a culture called the Hopewell culture (named after a farm where archaeologists first dug it up). These people lived in the Northeast and Midwest of North America (from modern New York to Missouri and from Wisconsin to Mississippi). Nobody knows for sure where the Hopewell culture got started - maybe these people lived first near Lake Erie and then expanded west and south, or maybe they lived first near Lake Superior and then expanded east and south. Or possibly they didn't move around at all, but just invited towns near them to join their network. Most of the towns and villages of the Hopewell culture were along the banks of rivers, and traders and rulers used the rivers to travel between the towns in canoes. The Hopewell people were mainly farmers, living on squash, sunflower seeds, and various grasses like wild rice, but they did not yet grow much corn, because it wouldn't grow well so far north. They built a lot of big earth mounds in various shapes, but nobody is sure what the mounds were for - maybe for burials.

Around 400 AD, the Hopewell culture collapsed. Nobody knows why this happened. It may have something to do with changes in the environment. After several hundred years, the Mississippian culture took its place.

More about the Mississippian Culture

Bibliography and further reading about the Hopewell culture

Mississippian culture
Native American history
Central and South America
Quatr.us home


Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

Help support Quatr.us!

Quatr.us (formerly "History for Kids") is entirely supported by your generous donations and by our sponsors. Most donors give about $10. Can you give $10 today to keep this site running? Or give $50 to sponsor a page?

With Mother's Day coming up, remember the Mother Goddesses: Mut, Isis, Gaia, Hera, Demeter, Parvati, and the Corn Mother. And honor powerful mothers: Ankhesenpepi II, Agrippina, Wu Chao, Blanche of Castile, Catherine de' Medici, Hamida Banu and Nur Jahan, Nurbanu Sultan, Sofia Baffo, Xiaozhuang, Anne of Austria. A great Mother's Day story: Kleobis and Biton.