This week: Gay Pride Month
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Projects and Pages for mid June:

black men and women all dressed up in a group
Juneteenth Day celebration, Texas (1900)

JUNETEENTH: June 19th is celebrated as Juneteenth, the day in 1865 when the last enslaved African-Americans in Galveston, Texas finally got the word that they were free, more than two years after Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. More about share-cropping after the war, and the civil rights movement.

diagram of earth and sun
Changing seasons

SUMMER SOLSTICE: Tuesday, June 20th is the summer solstice - the longest day of the year. You can find out more here about why the seasons change, what the sun and sunlight are made of, what a photon is, and how the earth and the moon and the sun go around each other. This year, it's also a full moon! Here's a fun game to play to understand the solstice better.

This week in history:

T'ANG DYNASTY: June 18, 618 AD - T'ang Dynasty gets started when a Sui Dynasty general, Li Shih-min, puts his father Li Yuan on the throne as the first T'ang emperor. Eight years later, Li Shih-min made his father abdicate and took over himself as the Chinese emperor T'ai Tseung.

MAGNA CARTA: June 15, 1215 AD - King John of England puts his seal on the Magna Carta, establishing rights and limiting the power of the king. Where did that lead? To Cromwell, John Locke, and then to the Constitution.

BATTLE OF WATERLOO: June 18, 1815 AD - Napoleon got his start as a general defending France after the Revolution, when all the other European countries attacked it. But then Napoleon took over France, and then took over the rest of Europe. In 1812 he was defeated and exiled, only to come back from exile for one last whack at it - but the British beat him at the Battle of Waterloo and that was the end of his power.

WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK: See in the summer solstice - can you tell when the days start to get shorter again? Check sunset against a clock for a few days. Enjoy the long evenings outside!

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Featured articles this week:

PARIS: - Because we're leaving this week on a research trip to Paris, we've been looking over Quatr.us articles about Paris: St. Germain des Pres, Notre Dame, Chartres, the Conciergerie, the Sainte Chapelle, and the castle of Vincennes. On this trip, we'll be writing about the history of Paris after the Middle Ages!

History Deals of the Week:

Useful books if you're going to Paris, starting with David Macaulay's Cathedral, a wonderful account of how medieval Europeans built their great cathedrals (and a steal at $9.67 in paper). Also check out Macaulay's Castle which explains how medieval people built those, for only $8.07. Then there's Victor Hugo's Hunchback of Notre Dame, or if that seems too ambitious for summer, try the movie.

New discoveries this week:

OLDEST HOMO SAPIENS: The big news is certainly the discovery in Morocco of the oldest known homo sapiens traces, going back to 300,000 years ago - almost twice as old as the earliest homo sapiens we knew about before, and in an entirely different part of Africa. It looks like modern humans have been around much longer, and have been more widespread, than we thought.

AMARNA BUILT BY KIDS? The next most interesting: a cemetery outside the Egyptian pharaoh Akhenaten's capital at Amarna is full of children and teenagers who seem to have been worked to death. Was Akhenaten's beautiful capital built by enslaved, bullied children?

HOPEWELL IMMIGRANTS: Why were Hopewell period Native American mounds so much more impressive and full of imported stuff than earlier Adena mounds? Brad Lepper suggests immigration brought the Hopewell people new ideas, new technologies, and a general burst of enthusiasm - and that immigrants can do the same thing today, if we let them.

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Seasonal food of the week:

BEANS: With peas ripe now, I thought we'd feature beans this week - you could start with fresh beans and make beef and string bean stir-fry, or Greek string bean stew, or a Nicoise salad. But of course dried beans are really the main use for beans: try making hummus or falafel, or black bean burgers, all terrific with now-in-season tomatoes and cucumbers. How about black-eyed peas and rice, chickpeas on polenta, lentil and sweet potato stew, or pasta e fagioli?

Also check out our seasonal and budget recipes at Gevirts.com.

Or, view an extensive range of science and history based educational and learning toys by visiting www.mykidneedsthat.com now.

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Also check out these
kids discount codes too!


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Karen Carr is Associate Professor Emerita, Department of History, Portland State University. She holds a doctorate in Classical Art and Archaeology from the University of Michigan. Follow her on Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter, or buy her book, Vandals to Visigoths.
Karen Carr is Associate Professor Emerita, Department of History, Portland State University. She holds a doctorate in Classical Art and Archaeology from the University of Michigan. Follow her on Instagram or Twitter, or buy her book, Vandals to Visigoths.
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