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Woodland period Native American history

By |2018-10-05T06:52:43+00:00August 10th, 2017|History, Native American|

Early Anasazi (Pueblo) pottery from about 550-800 AD Early Woodland The third period of North American history, after the Archaic period, is the Woodland period. What happened in the Archaic period? More Native American articles The Early Woodland period began in the southern and midwestern part of North America about 1200 BC. People like [...]

Early Shawnee history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:39+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Serpent Mound (Ohio, about 500 BC?) Shawnee people were related to the Algonquin and the Cree, and spoke a related Athabascan language, but they lived a little further south, in the mid-west (modern Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Kentucky). Indeed, the word "Shawnee" may mean "south people". The Shawnee lived more like their neighbors than like [...]

Mississippian period – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:37+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cahokia mound in Illinois, where a Mississippian city was After 800 AD the Mississippian culture developed all along the Mississippi and the Missouri valleys, replacing the earlier Woodland culture. Now many people lived in towns. They built temples and palaces on top of big earth mounds. They had wooden fortification walls around their towns, with [...]

Mississippi People – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:36+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Mississippian warrior About 800 AD, the old Hopewell people seem to have developed what we call the Mississippian culture. People living near the Mississippi river got new kinds of corn about this time. Now, instead of just building burial mounds, people built mounds with flat tops and built buildings on top of the mounds, like a Mayan temple. Some [...]

Early Mandan history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:36+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shawnee state forest in Ohio - where the Mandan were living in 500 AD The Mandan were relatives of the Sioux people. Around 500 AD, they probably lived in the Midwest of North America, in what is now Ohio. Like their Sioux relatives, and like the Mississippians to their south, the Crow to their west and the Shawnee to their east, the Mandan [...]

Hopewell history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-08T11:23:04+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Hopewell Mound in Ohio About 200 BC, people - including the Adena people - formed a culture called the Hopewell culture (named after a farm where archaeologists first dug it up). These people lived in the Northeast and Midwest of North America (from modern New York to Missouri and from Wisconsin to Mississippi). Nobody knows for [...]

Early Native American art

By |2018-04-07T17:05:25+00:00August 8th, 2017|Art, Native American|

A Woodland period pipe shaped like a dog (from modern Alabama) We don't really have any art from North America in the Paleo-Indian period, before about 8000 BC. Even from the Archaic period (down to about 1000 BC), there isn't anything specifically created as art. Beginning near the end of the Archaic period, though, and then [...]

Yayoi – Iron Age Japan

By |2018-04-18T09:53:57+00:00July 27th, 2017|History, Japan|

Yayoi pottery, ca. 100-200 AD By about 800 BC, most people in Japan were shifting from Stone Age hunting and gathering to farming rice for most of their food (but they were still also eating a lot of fish). People in Japan started raising pigs at this time, too, brought over from China. Like farmers everywhere, people in Japan started to fight over land, and [...]