sunflowers

/Tag: sunflowers

American science after colonization

By |2018-04-08T11:21:58-07:00September 28th, 2017|Americas, Native American, North America, Science|

European trade goods (thanks to Nebraska Game and Parks Division) North American people made rapid scientific advances in the course of the 1500s AD, inspired by contacts with traders and explorers from Europe. People learned how to tame horses and ride them, and they learned how to use guns. They also began to use a [...]

American food history – tacos to… tacos!

By |2018-04-24T09:45:59-07:00August 11th, 2017|Food, North America|

People eating in Virginia, about 1550 AD (from the British Museum) Native American food In 1500 AD, most of the people living in North America, like the Pueblo, the Cherokee, the Iroquois, and the Mississippians, ate mainly beans and corn and squash. Sometimes people ate their corn baked into tacos or tortillas; other times people boiled corn into mush or soup. To go with [...]

Early Native American science and inventions – History of Science – North America

By |2018-04-24T08:21:21-07:00August 10th, 2017|Native American, Science|

Native American science: Sunflowers growing in a field Domesticating sunflowers Probably the greatest contribution of Native American people to science before 1500 AD was the domestication of several plants, especially sunflowers in eastern North America. These plants were very useful to them. And now they are useful to the people of the whole world. Farmers had to work on this [...]

Early Sioux history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:40-07:00August 10th, 2017|History, Native American|

Mound on Lake Marion, Santee River (thanks to Wikipedia) About 800 AD, ancestors of the Sioux people probably lived in the south-eastern part of North America, around where South Carolina is now. Like the Mississippians to their west, they built earth mounds, and probably they also farmed corn and beans and sunflowers. Around 1000-1300 AD, a global warming period encouraged [...]

Nez Perce history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-19T15:03:07-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Nez Perce pictograph carved into a rock The Nez Perce, who call themselves the Nimiipuu, meaning "The People", seem to have come down from Alaska to the Pacific Northwest about 10,000 BC, or even earlier. Some time later, maybe around 3000 BC, this group split off from the Chinook and other people, and moved further south and [...]

Mississippian period – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:37-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cahokia mound in Illinois, where a Mississippian city was After 800 AD the Mississippian culture developed all along the Mississippi and the Missouri valleys, replacing the earlier Woodland culture. Now many people lived in towns. They built temples and palaces on top of big earth mounds. They had wooden fortification walls around their towns, with [...]

Early Mandan history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:36-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shawnee state forest in Ohio - where the Mandan were living in 500 AD The Mandan were relatives of the Sioux people. Around 500 AD, they probably lived in the Midwest of North America, in what is now Ohio. Like their Sioux relatives, and like the Mississippians to their south, the Crow to their west and the Shawnee to their east, the Mandan [...]

Iroquois history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:00-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Early Iroquois history: Mohawk pottery Haudenosaunee Early Iroquois history starts when the Iroquois originally came to America with the other Native Americans. They may have first settled around what's now Maryland around 1000 AD. The Iroquois didn't call themselves "Iroquois", which is an Algonquin insult meaning "snakes". They called themselves the "Haudenosaunee", meaning "people who live in [...]

Hopewell history – Native Americans

By |2019-08-19T22:01:16-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Hopewell Mound in Ohio When was the Hopewell? About 200 BC, people - including the Adena people - formed a culture called the Hopewell culture. (It's named after a farm where archaeologists first dug it up). Earlier Adena people Empires timeline All our Native American articles These people lived in the Northeast and Midwest of [...]

Crow history – Native Americans

By |2019-04-29T11:43:07-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, North America|

Crow history and homeland: Lake Itasca, at the source of the Mississippi River What do Crow people call themselves? The Crow call themselves the Apsáalooke, the Bird's Children; Crow is an English translation of Apsáalooke. Native American languages All our Native American articles Where did early Crow live? Around 500 AD the Crow people seem [...]