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Medieval African clothing – more and more cotton

By | 2018-04-13T01:30:20+00:00 October 2nd, 2017|Africa, Clothing|

Cotton cloth made in Gujarat, India andfound in Fustat (Cairo, Egypt) - ca. 800 AD(Now in Oxford, England) People first began to weave cotton in India, also around 2000 BC, but cotton weaving soon spread to Egypt, and all down the east side of Africa. By the 400s AD, the people of Meroe and Kush were growing and weaving cotton for their clothes. Before 800 AD, [...]

Married women in West Asia

By | 2018-04-15T12:09:52+00:00 September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

Grindstone from Syria, about 1500 BC (Louvre Museum) Most married women in West Asia lived with their husband's family, so young married women took orders from their husband's mother. Sometimes the two women got along well; other times they fought the way many teenagers fight with their parents. Some families hit or starved [...]

Sassanians and the Silk Road – West Asian economy

By | 2018-04-09T10:31:21+00:00 September 12th, 2017|Economy, West Asia|

Coin of the Sassanian king Hormizd V (ca. 593 AD?) The most important part of the Sassanian economy, as in all other states in Late Antiquity, was farming - most people still were farmers, growing mainly wheat and barley. But most farmers didn't eat the food they grew. They sold their wheat or barley to a mill and used the money [...]

Ancient history timeline: 10,000-4000 BC – the Stone Age

By | 2018-04-19T15:03:06+00:00 September 10th, 2017|History, West Asia, When|

Ancient history timeline: Building at Gobekli Tepe in what is now  Turkey (ca. 9000 BC) Beginning of farming Around 10,000 BC, with the end of the last major Ice Age, people all over the world - not everyone, but a lot of people - began to shift from fishing and hunting and gathering to farming as their main way of getting food. Farming [...]

What are llamas? South American animals

By | 2018-04-12T08:53:21+00:00 September 8th, 2017|Environment, South America|

A llama in Bolivia Llamas evolved from camels. Camels evolved in North America about 45 million years ago. They lived in the Rocky Mountains and all across the southern part of North America. While they were still in North America, some camels evolved into llamas. Llamas spread from there south into South America about 3 million years ago. [...]

Ancient Roman Clothing – History of Clothing

By | 2017-08-31T17:09:28+00:00 August 31st, 2017|Clothing, Romans|

A man in a tunic with dreads in Roman North Africa Roman men and women, like other Indo-Europeans, originally seem to have worn a large piece of wool, wrapped around themselves. After they met people from Greece and Egypt, around 200 BC, they began to wear linen tunics (like T-shirts) under their wool robes, which was more comfortable. Roman leather [...]

Anne Hutchinson – A Puritan leader

By | 2017-08-14T14:47:35+00:00 August 14th, 2017|North America, Religion|

Boston in the time of Anne Hutchinson Anne Hutchinson was born in 1603, the same year that Queen Elizabeth died. Her father was a Puritan minister in England. Like Mary Cavendish about the same time, Hutchinson was home-schooled with her brothers and sisters. She became a Puritan too. Hutchinson liked the Puritan idea that faith – believing in Jesus – [...]

Sojourner Truth – African-American freedom

By | 2018-04-07T17:05:48+00:00 August 14th, 2017|History, North America|

Sojourner Truth Sojourner Truth didn't know where her people came from, because she was born into slavery. But it was probably West Africa or the Congo. She may have been part Native American. Sojourner Truth was born Isabella Baumfree in New York State, in 1797, just after the Revolutionary War. She had about ten brothers and sisters; they [...]

The Navajo get sheep – American history

By | 2017-08-13T22:25:08+00:00 August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Navajo with sheep Navajo people moved south into the south-west part of North America from their home in Canada about 1400 AD. So when the Spanish invaders came in the 1500s, the Navajo (Dine is what they call themselves) were themselves pretty new to the area. When the Navajo arrived, they had been nomads, who lived [...]

Iroquois and the Revolutionary War

By | 2017-08-13T17:21:16+00:00 August 13th, 2017|History|

Trade beads made in Venice in the 1600s and traded in North America When the first European traders came to the north Atlantic coast, about 1600 AD, the Iroquois were very interested in trading with them. People sold the Dutch traders lots and lots of beaver furs to make hats with, and in exchange they got glass beads and wool blankets, steel knives, sewing needles, and [...]