World War I

Home » World War I

Ottoman Empire in the 1700s

By | 2017-09-11T10:47:26+00:00 September 11th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Enderun Library, Topkapi Palace (Istanbul, 1719) By 1703 AD, people were unhappy enough with Feyzullah Efendi that the Sultan killed him. The Sultan's mother, Rabia Gulnus, took charge of the government. Rabia's main worry was Peter the Great's strength in Russia, just north of the Ottoman Empire. In 1710, Rabia had her son declare [...]

What is rubber? History of rubber

By | 2017-09-08T09:34:32+00:00 September 8th, 2017|Science, South America|

A big rubber tree in Mexico Olmec people, living in southern Mexico, invented rubber about 1600 BC. It was just as they were beginning to build their empire. Rubber starts out as the sap of a Central American tree - the rubber tree. You tap the tree or cut it down for the sap. Then you mix the sap [...]

What is typhus? History of diseases

By | 2017-09-07T10:30:32+00:00 September 7th, 2017|Science|

A woman with typhus Nobody seems to have caught typhus before about 1450 AD, so the disease probably didn't exist until then. Typhus is an infection caused by tiny germs (bacteria) that live inside animal cells, and most people caught the germs from lice, when the lice bit them (the lice die of typhus too). [...]

Influenza – History of Medicine

By | 2017-09-07T08:01:28+00:00 September 6th, 2017|Science|

Clay hen whistle from Mohenjo Daro (ca. 2700 BC, now in Brooklyn Museum) Influenza is a virus that mostly infects birds - like chickens - and pigs. But influenza can also attack people. Probably people started to get influenza around the time they started keeping chickens and living in cities - in China and India, about 3000 BC, in Greece about 500 BC, and in North [...]

Quakers – Society of Friends – Religion

By | 2017-08-14T23:37:27+00:00 August 14th, 2017|Modern Europe, North America, Religion|

A Quaker wedding (1800s in England) In 1648 AD, some people in England felt unhappy with the way Puritan Christians were praying to God. So they started to do things their own way. One early Quaker was a man named George Fox. But generally the Quakers (who call themselves the Friends) had no leaders, priests, or ministers. [...]

American clothing – 1900s AD

By | 2017-08-10T23:04:51+00:00 August 10th, 2017|Clothing, North America|

Girls working in a mill, about 1900 AD By about 1900, though, cloth and clothing got cheap enough that there was a big change in how people thought about clothes. Instead of wearing many layers of clothes, a lot of people started to wear different clothes every day. Young kids wore cotton dresses - both [...]

European Warfare – Military history

By | 2017-08-07T21:45:23+00:00 August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, War|

British cannon from the Hundred Years' War (now at Mont St. Michel) Not long before 1500 AD, everything medieval soldiers did in wars suddenly changed. First, Europeans learned how to make and use gunpowder from Central Asian scientists, and they put gunpowder into metal cannons. Once you had cannons, you could blow holes in thick castle walls and in soldiers' armor, and [...]

In Flanders Fields – a war poem

By | 2017-08-07T21:40:36+00:00 August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, War|

Poppies growing in a field This poem, written by John McCrae in May 1915, was one of the most famous poems of World War I. McCrae himself died in the war in 1918, and his poem is remembered every year when millions of people wear red poppies pinned to their jackets or hats to [...]

Jean-Paul Sartre – European philosophy

By | 2017-08-07T08:49:39+00:00 August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, Philosophy|

Jean-Paul Sartre - a French philosopher After World War I, many people in Europe felt that the old world had ended and a new world was beginning. Jean-Paul Sartre grew up at the beginning of that new world. Sartre's father died of a fever when Sartre was two years old, and his mother [...]

Simone de Beauvoir – European philosophy

By | 2017-08-06T19:47:49+00:00 August 6th, 2017|Modern Europe, Philosophy|

Simone de Beauvoir Simone de Beauvoir's family lost most of their money after World War I. But by the early 1900s, even struggling families tried to send their daughters to school. De Beauvoir and her sister went to a good convent school. De Beauvoir thought of becoming a nun. But when she was 14 years old, [...]