squash

/Tag: squash

Iroquois history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:00-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Early Iroquois history: Mohawk pottery Haudenosaunee Early Iroquois history starts when the Iroquois originally came to America with the other Native Americans. They may have first settled around what's now Maryland around 1000 AD. The Iroquois didn't call themselves "Iroquois", which is an Algonquin insult meaning "snakes". They called themselves the "Haudenosaunee", meaning "people who live in [...]

Hopewell history – Native Americans

By |2019-08-19T22:01:16-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Hopewell Mound in Ohio When was the Hopewell? About 200 BC, people - including the Adena people - formed a culture called the Hopewell culture. (It's named after a farm where archaeologists first dug it up). Earlier Adena people Empires timeline All our Native American articles These people lived in the Northeast and Midwest of [...]

Crow history – Native Americans

By |2019-04-29T11:43:07-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, North America|

Crow history and homeland: Lake Itasca, at the source of the Mississippi River What do Crow people call themselves? The Crow call themselves the Apsáalooke, the Bird's Children; Crow is an English translation of Apsáalooke. Native American languages All our Native American articles Where did early Crow live? Around 500 AD the Crow people seem [...]

Cherokee history – Native American history

By |2019-03-21T11:21:36-07:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cherokee history: statues from Etowah (now northern Georgia) from about 1300 AD (maybe these should really be counted as Creek?) The Ani Chota The Cherokee nation was the largest nation of eastern North America.  They were probably also the most important. But they did not call themselves the Cherokee. They called themselves the [...]

Adena history – Native Americans

By |2019-01-17T08:59:44-07:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Adena Great Serpent Mound, Ohio (700 BC - 200 AD) Who were the Adena people? People called the Adena lived along the Ohio river valley (in modern Ohio) during the Early Woodland period, beginning about 700 BC. More about the Woodland period All our Native American articles How did they get their food? These [...]

Iroquois food – What did Iroquois people eat?

By |2018-12-12T11:00:28-07:00August 8th, 2017|Food, Native American|

Iroquois food: Corn, beans, and squash growing together Corn and beans and squash People who lived in the Iroquois nation in the northeast part of North America ate mainly corn and beans and squash that they farmed: the Three Sisters. They made the corn into flat bread like tacos or tortillas. Inside the tortillas, they rolled up mashed beans and squash, like a [...]

Native American food – North America – pemmican and succotash

By |2019-02-09T10:12:03-07:00August 8th, 2017|Food, Native American|

Native American food: Inuit carving of a sea lion Hunting and gathering wild food Early on, until about 2000 BC, people in North America ate only wild foods that they could hunt or gather. More about gathering Paleo-Indians in North America All our Native American articles Salmon, wapato, pine nuts and acorn flour These foods varied according to the environment where [...]

Cherokee food – What did Cherokee people eat?

By |2018-12-19T11:19:25-07:00August 8th, 2017|Food, Native American|

Cherokee food: Corn on the cob The Three Sisters People who lived in the Cherokee nation were mostly farmers. They ate mainly corn and beans and squash (the "Three Sisters") that they grew in their fields. More about the Three Sisters Cherokee history All Native American articles How did the Cherokee cook corn? They made the corn into flat breads like tacos and tortillas [...]

Three Sisters – corn, beans, and squash

By |2018-04-07T17:05:27-07:00August 8th, 2017|Economy, Food, Native American|

Corn, beans, and squash growing together When people in South America began to farm corn and beans and squash, they worked out a system for growing all three plants in the same field that was good for all of the plants and made them grow better than they would have on their own. Women planted the corn first, [...]

Cherokee economy – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:26-07:00August 8th, 2017|Economy, Native American|

Cherokee fishing weir on the Little Tennessee River in Macon County. (Thanks to Ralph Preston) People who lived in the Cherokee nation got their meat from hunting and fishing, and from gathering shellfish, and their corn and beans and squash from farming. Usually men did the hunting and fishing. They built little rock walls in the water - fishing weirs - [...]