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The Shoshone fight the United States

By |2018-05-17T16:30:44+00:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shoshone history: a Shoshone woman and baby The Shoshone get horses After the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 AD, some Shoshone people in Wyoming bought horses. These horse-riders split off from the other Shoshone and became the Comanche. At that point, Shoshone history becomes separate from Comanche history. (Read more about the Comanche) The rest of the Shoshone still [...]

Mandan and Sacagawea – American history

By |2017-08-13T17:54:38+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Mandan village in 1832 Around 1500 AD, Mandan women began to build round houses, or lodges, instead of rectangular ones. They also started using bison skin tipis when they were travelling or hunting. By the 1600s, the Mandan were probably already catching European diseases like measles and smallpox from their Sioux and Mississippian neighbors, even though they hadn't met any Europeans yet. [...]

Lewis and Clark – American history

By |2017-08-13T17:28:54+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, North America|

Lewis and Clark In 1804 AD, the Sioux people received a visit from official representatives of the newly formed United States government. The visitors' names were Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Both of them had already killed many Native Americans. Mostly they had killed Shawnee. They were fighting to take Shawnee land in the Appalachians. The Sioux didn't [...]

The Crow get horses – American history

By |2018-04-08T11:21:54+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Crow men In the 1600s AD, Crow people were still living in the Dakotas. But they caught smallpox and measles from their neighbors, the Mandan, and many Crow people died. So even though they had not yet met any Europeans, Crow people's lives were still very much changed by European settlers. Crow people met Europeans for the first time in [...]

Early Sioux history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:40+00:00August 10th, 2017|History, Native American|

Mound on Lake Marion, Santee River (thanks to Wikipedia) About 800 AD, ancestors of the Sioux people probably lived in the south-eastern part of North America, around where South Carolina is now. Like the Mississippians to their west, they built earth mounds, and probably they also farmed corn and beans and sunflowers. Around 1000-1300 AD, a global warming period encouraged [...]

Early Mandan history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:36+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shawnee state forest in Ohio - where the Mandan were living in 500 AD The Mandan were relatives of the Sioux people. Around 500 AD, they probably lived in the Midwest of North America, in what is now Ohio. Like their Sioux relatives, and like the Mississippians to their south, the Crow to their west and the Shawnee to their east, the Mandan [...]

Crow history – Native Americans

By |2017-08-09T01:25:41+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, North America|

Lake Itasca, at the source of the Mississippi River The Crow call themselves the Apsáalooke, the Bird's Children; Crow is an English translation of Apsáalooke. Around 500 AD the Crow people seem to have been living around the sources of the Mississippi river in Wisconsin or Minnesota, as part of the Hidatsa people, who spoke [...]

Native American government

By |2018-04-24T09:45:58+00:00August 8th, 2017|Government, Native American|

A Mandan village in 1832 In the Paleo-Indian period, everyone in North America lived in small bands, usually just your family and maybe one or two other families - not more than ten to fifteen people. Most of the time, those were the only people you saw, and your mom, or your uncle or grandpa or [...]

Native American games – lacrosse, swimming, dice

By |2018-04-11T18:30:20+00:00August 8th, 2017|Games, Native American|

Cherokee lacrosse players from 1888 People who lived in North America played both active games and the kind where you can sit down. Their favorite active game was lacrosse. Or actually lacrosse and a lot of other games that you play with a stick and a ball, with rules that were different in different parts [...]

History of swimming in the Americas

By |2018-04-20T08:23:49+00:00June 23rd, 2017|Games, North America, South America|

Aztec swimmer from Teotihuacan (ca. 500 AD) The first people who came to the Americas probably already knew how to swim, as they got their food from fishing and gathering shellfish and seaweed. Aztec paintings from the 500s AD show swimmers using a flutter kick and possibly a crawl stroke. Arawak or [...]