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Visit Rome with kids! What to see, where to stay

By |2018-04-20T08:22:40+00:00September 4th, 2017|History, Romans|

Checking out the Servian Wall in Rome You'll never run out of things to do with kids in Rome! The Roman Forum is a good place to start - plenty of room to climb and run. At the end of the Forum is the Colosseum, where gladiators killed lions, and if you have enough energy, afterwards [...]

Roman families – children and households in ancient Rome

By |2018-04-25T10:21:33+00:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

A Roman family on a tombstone The Roman idea of family included not just a husband and wife and their children, but also their slaves (if they had any), so that it meant something more like a family-owned business with the employees. Because of this, Roman men had more power within the family than Roman women did - they [...]

Visit Italy with kids! Sights to see

By |2018-04-25T10:19:37+00:00September 3rd, 2017|History, Medieval, Romans|

Leaning Tower of Pisa Visiting Italy with kids is a blast, because many Italians are very friendly to other people's children and everyone will always be talking to your kids, helping you out, making them laugh, and generally helping you have a good time. Don't be too suspicious - relax and enjoy the [...]

What is baptism? – History of Christianity

By |2018-04-24T15:45:39+00:00August 21st, 2017|History, Religion, Romans|

Torchlight parade (this one is actually in India) Even before the time of Jesus, many mystery religions of the ancient Mediterranean had some sort of ceremony that people had to do in order to join the cult. Some of these, like the Eleusinian mysteries, involved dipping yourself in water to wash away your past life, and to show that [...]

Native American Daily Life

By |2018-04-24T10:38:17+00:00August 10th, 2017|Native American, People|

An Apache woman holding a baby in a cradleboard Most kids in North America lived with their mothers and fathers and brothers and sisters. Most families lived in one room of a pueblo, or one tipi or hogan or wickiup. Because a lot of kids died of sicknesses, you usually had a lot of brothers and sisters. [...]

Simone de Beauvoir – European philosophy

By |2018-04-24T09:15:35+00:00August 6th, 2017|Modern Europe, Philosophy|

Simone de Beauvoir Simone de Beauvoir's family lost most of their money after World War I. But by the early 1900s, even struggling families tried to send their daughters to school. De Beauvoir and her sister went to a good convent school. De Beauvoir thought of becoming a nun. But when she was 14 years old, [...]

European writing – books, poetry, Bibles

By |2018-04-11T18:19:12+00:00August 6th, 2017|History, Modern Europe|

Reproduction of a press from Gutenberg's time The invention of the European printing press with moveable type in northern Europe in the late 1400s AD was no accident: publishers had set out to find a way to create a lot of books cheaply, because there was a new market for the books. More and more European families [...]

Medieval people – Life in medieval Europe

By |2018-04-24T11:23:07+00:00August 4th, 2017|Medieval, People|

Madonna and child (Donatello) The way people thought about each other in the Middle Ages, everyone was involved in complicated systems of relationships with each other. The first relationships people had were with their own families. In medieval European families, most kids lived with their father and mother and brothers and sisters. Because people died [...]

al Tabari – Medieval Islamic medicine

By |2018-04-18T18:18:05+00:00July 27th, 2017|Islam, Science|

Al Tabari's homeland in Tabiristan Al Tabari was from a Christian family in the Abbasid Empire, near the Caspian Sea (modern Iran). His father, Sahl, was himself a doctor who proposed a new treatment for epilepsy. Al Tabari was born about 838 AD. When he grew up, he moved to Baghdad, where there were other scholars to talk [...]

Al Razi – Medieval Islamic science

By |2018-04-24T08:21:22+00:00July 27th, 2017|Islam, Science|

A manuscript copy of Al Razi's writing (from 1094 AD) Al Razi was born in Iran, in the Samanid kingdom, in 865 AD, when Iran was part of the Abbasid Empire. The Samanids were traders who encouraged education and the arts, and many scientists and artists lived in their kingdom. Al Razi seems to have started out as [...]