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Married women in West Asia

By |2019-02-02T06:11:38-07:00September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

Grindstone from Syria, about 1500 BC (Louvre Museum) Most married women in West Asia lived with their husband's family, so young married women took orders from their husband's mother. Sometimes the two women got along well; other times they fought the way many teenagers fight with their parents. Some families hit or starved [...]

Girls and young women in West Asia

By |2019-07-06T09:40:13-07:00September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

West Asian girls: An enslaved woman stands behind a free Elamite woman who is spinning (600s BC) Women were oppressed In West Asia, even more than in most other state societies all over the world, men did not allow women to do all the things that men did. People valued women less than men, and [...]

West Asian people – families, schools, slavery

By |2018-04-13T01:45:11-07:00September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

West Asian people: Ur-Nanshe, the king's chief musician in Mari, 2400s BC Oppression of women What we notice most about the way people lived in West Asia is the widespread oppression of women. As compared to their neighbors in Sudan, Egypt, Central Asia, the Roman Empire, or even India, West Asian women were [...]

Slavery in ancient Rome

By |2018-04-25T10:26:05-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

A Roman shepherd, probably a slave (Istanbul, 500s AD) Many Roman people were owned by other people, or by the Roman government, as slaves. Because the Romans didn't really have hourly wage work, or salaried work, as we do now, men and women who didn't own their own land and didn't own businesses of their own were often enslaved. [...]

Roman schools – education in ancient Rome

By |2019-02-13T06:33:52-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

Roman education outside of school: A Roman teacher home-schooling, about 200 AD Poor kids had to work Roman schools were for rich boys; most Roman kids did not go to school. Like their parents, they worked in the fields hoeing and weeding and plowing as soon as they were old enough. More about Roman farming History of schools [...]

Roman women: Women in ancient Rome – gender and power

By |2018-05-16T23:44:59-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

Roman women: an old woman, about 50 AD. The sculptor has made her look silly on purpose to make fun of old women Were women oppressed in ancient Rome? Roman women lived under many restrictions that did not apply to Roman men. Roman women knew that men were treating them unfairly, and they [...]

Ancient Roman people – who lived in the Roman Empire?

By |2018-04-25T10:24:36-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

A barmaid brings a drink to two men sitting on chairs. The words show the men arguing about whose drink it is. (Caupona of Salvius, Pompeii, 79 AD) The Roman Empire was so big that there were a lot of different people with different cultures living in it. So you can't really say there was one [...]

Roman high school – education in ancient Rome

By |2019-08-14T00:02:34-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

Roman high school: A fragment of Homer's Iliad on papyrus Who went to high school? Only the richest and smartest Roman boys went on from elementary school to high school. Most girls couldn't go to high school, but some girls were homeschooled. Roman schools Egyptian schools All our ancient Rome articles Leaving home for [...]

Roman freedmen and freedwomen

By |2019-06-16T06:47:06-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

Roman freedmen - A gravestone for a freedwoman, put up by her husband, who was also a freedman (ILS 1221, Rome, 80 BC) What are freedmen and freedwomen? Freedmen and freedwomen were people in ancient Rome who had once been enslaved but had managed to get legally free. Slavery in ancient Rome The Roman family [...]

Roman family – children and households in ancient Rome

By |2019-06-04T06:23:09-07:00September 4th, 2017|People, Romans|

A Roman family on a tombstone Roman definitions of family The Roman idea of family included not just a husband and wife and their children, but also the people they enslaved (if they had any), and free employees. So it meant something more like a household, or a family-owned business. Roman economy Roman women [...]