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Early Cheyenne history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:53+00:00September 28th, 2017|History, North America|

Cheyenne history: For a long time, Cheyenne people lived in Minnesota, along rivers like this one. Algonquin and Cheyenne Cheyenne people are related to the Algonquin people. From the Paleo-Indian period onward Cheyenne people lived in the Great Lakes area (in modern Minnesota). They were related to other Algonquin people like the Blackfoot and the Cree. "Cheyenne" is [...]

Puritans – American religion

By |2017-08-14T15:33:52+00:00August 14th, 2017|Modern Europe, North America, Religion|

A Puritan family about 1563 About 1563 AD, some people in England decided that they wanted to follow a way of life that they thought would be more according to what the Christian God wanted. They called themselves "the godly", but other people called them "Puritans." Puritan people, like Calvinists, thought only God decided whether you got into Heaven. [...]

Anne Hutchinson – A Puritan leader

By |2017-08-14T14:47:35+00:00August 14th, 2017|North America, Religion|

Boston in the time of Anne Hutchinson Anne Hutchinson was born in 1603, the same year that Queen Elizabeth died. Her father was a Puritan minister in England. Like Mary Cavendish about the same time, Hutchinson was home-schooled with her brothers and sisters. She became a Puritan too. Hutchinson liked the Puritan idea that faith – believing in Jesus – [...]

Iroquois history: the Revolutionary War

By |2018-04-24T10:20:26+00:00August 13th, 2017|History|

Iroquois history: Trade beads made in Venice in the 1600s and traded in North America Iroquois trade for beads and knives When the first European traders came to the north Atlantic coast, about 1600 AD, the Iroquois were very interested in trading with them. People sold the Dutch traders lots and lots of beaver furs to make hats with, and [...]

United States Independence – American history

By |2018-04-19T11:29:06+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American, North America|

Rock Art from Utah, about 1700 AD In the 1700s AD, most of North America was still under the control of native people. Because Pueblo people and the Navajo had taken Spanish invaders' horses and traded them north, they and the Sioux, Ute, Blackfoot, and other Plains Indians did very well. Hunting bison was much easier on horseback than it had been on foot. And [...]

Algonquin tribe during European colonization

By |2018-04-09T15:49:40+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

People of the Algonquin tribe in the 1700s AD Algonquin people sold beaver furs to European traders When European traders began to buy huge amounts of North American furs to sell in Europe and China, Algonquin hunters began to trap and hunt lots of animals, especially beaver, to get their fur to sell to the European traders. The [...]

American clothing – 1600s AD

By |2017-08-10T16:55:02+00:00August 10th, 2017|Clothing, North America|

Algonquin people with wool blankets In the 1600s, most people still dressed the same as they had before, in deerskins. But in the south-west, Pueblo and Navajo people began to buy wool clothing from the Spanish settlers. Europeans produced a lot of wool to sell, so they wanted to sell it to Americans. The wool clothes were cheaper than deerskin, [...]

Early Native American languages

By |2018-04-07T17:05:42+00:00August 10th, 2017|Literature, Native American|

Inuit carving of a fish The languages Native American people spoke (and still speak) in North America fall into several groups. The Cherokee and the Iroquois, on the East Coast, spoke Iroquoian languages. In the midwest, the Sioux, the Crow, and the Mandan spoke related languages. In the Pacific Northwest, the Chinook and the Nez Perce shared a language group. In the Southwest, the Shoshone, [...]

Early Shawnee history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:39+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Serpent Mound (Ohio, about 500 BC?) Shawnee people were related to the Algonquin and the Cree, and spoke a related Athabascan language, but they lived a little further south, in the mid-west (modern Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Kentucky). Indeed, the word "Shawnee" may mean "south people". The Shawnee lived more like their neighbors than like [...]

Mississippian period – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:37+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cahokia mound in Illinois, where a Mississippian city was After 800 AD the Mississippian culture developed all along the Mississippi and the Missouri valleys, replacing the earlier Woodland culture. Now many people lived in towns. They built temples and palaces on top of big earth mounds. They had wooden fortification walls around their towns, with [...]