tuberculosis

Home » tuberculosis

What is tuberculosis? History of diseases

By |2018-04-18T18:18:04+00:00September 7th, 2017|Science, West Asia|

A child with tuberculosis Tuberculosis is a lung disease caused by germs. Today we can usually cure it with antibiotics. But in antiquity there was no cure. Many people died of tuberculosis. One kind of tuberculosis seems to have infected people since the Paleolithic. It came to North America and South America with the first people, about 13,000 BC. This tuberculosis [...]

What is opium? World history of medicine and drugs

By |2017-09-07T09:33:48+00:00September 7th, 2017|Central Asia, Science|

Opium poppy flower Opium comes from a kind of poppy flower. It evolved around 100 million years ago in West Asia and Central Asia. People probably realized as soon as they got to West Asia, about 60,000 years ago, that you could use opium as a medicine. By 6000 BC, in the Stone Age, West Asian farmers were already growing opium in their [...]

The Inuit and Canadian history

By |2017-11-09T18:05:58+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

An Inuit village in 1575 AD In 1500 AD, the Inuit weren't doing so well. They had been buying steel and iron weapons from Vikings and East Asian traders. They used their good weapons to hunt whales, and they lived on whale meat and built houses of whalebone. That was still working in Alaska. But in Greenland, the [...]

European science in the 1800s

By |2018-04-16T10:32:30+00:00August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, Science|

European boys at school in the 1800s In the first half of the 1800s AD, countries in northern Europe like France and Britain forced India, Ghana, Nigeria, Canada, and other countries to give them food. That meant that many people in northern Europe could stop farming and get an education. Families sent more boys to school than girls, so most of the educated people were [...]

Spain loses her colonies – 1800s

By |2018-04-28T17:48:29+00:00August 6th, 2017|History, Modern Europe|

Maria Christina Spain was among the first Western countries to get colonies in the 1500s, and it was among the first to lose its colonies in the 1800s. In 1810, Chile declared independence. Then in 1821, Mexico and Peru became independent too. At the same time, Spain began to rock back and forth between democracy and [...]

Henry VIII of England – The Tudors

By |2018-04-11T09:31:50+00:00August 5th, 2017|History, Modern Europe|

Henry VIII When Henry VII died in 1509, his son Henry VIII became king of England. He was only 18 years old, but he grabbed his power and ran with it. Like the Ottoman sultans, like Francis I in France, and like Charles Quint in the rest of Europe at the same time, Henry VIII worked to make his country more [...]

Medieval medicine in Europe

By |2018-04-24T08:21:21+00:00August 4th, 2017|History|

Sick children from medieval Europe During the Middle Ages, most people were sick with something for most of their lives. Newborns were often born small because their mothers had not had enough to eat when they were pregnant. Babies caught dysentery and typhoid from drinking water with sewage mixed in it. About a quarter of all babies died before they were [...]

Heian period – Early Medieval Japan

By |2018-04-18T09:53:54+00:00July 27th, 2017|History, Japan|

Godai Kokuzo Bodhisattva (Jingo-ji Temple, Kyoto), ca. 800-900 AD After Empress Koken died in 770 AD, there was a major change in how Japan's government worked. The powerful families got more power, the same way they did in China about this time. Women were shut out of power. The next emperor, Konin, was an old man (62 years [...]

Medieval Islamic medicine – the first hospitals and quarantines

By |2018-04-18T18:18:05+00:00July 27th, 2017|Islam, Science|

Islamic medicine: From an Ottoman manuscript, two doctors telling the pharmacist how to make different medicines Writing medical encyclopedias Doctors made big scientific advances in medicine during the Islamic empire. Islamic doctors began by collecting all the medical observations and logic of the past. They translated the work of Hippocrates and his followers, and Galen, into Arabic. About 750 [...]

Ibn Sina (Avicenna) – Medieval Islamic medicine – Islamic Empire

By |2018-04-24T08:21:22+00:00July 27th, 2017|Islam, Science|

Where Ibn Sina came from: Uzbekistan Ibn Sina and the Samanids in Uzbekistan Ibn Sina (known to Europeans as Avicenna) was a scientist. He was born about 980 AD in the north-eastern part of the Abbasid Empire. That was in the kingdom of the Samanids. (It's modern Uzbekistan.) The Samanids supported science and art, so many scientists and artists [...]