slavery

Home » slavery

Islamic North Africa – caravans across the Sahara

By | 2017-10-29T16:53:32+00:00 October 3rd, 2017|Africa, History|

Kairouan mosque (ca. 800 AD) The Eastern Roman reconquest of North Africa in the 530s AD ended the Vandal kingdom there. But trade declined until the Islamic invasions of North Africa in the 600s AD and the establishment of the Umayyad, and then the Fatimid dynasties. Fatimids Under Islamic rule, North Africa became part of a large trading network [...]

Life in ancient Africa – gender, slavery, food, clothing

By | 2017-10-02T12:29:29+00:00 October 2nd, 2017|Africa, People|

Mary and Jesus, from Ethiopia (ca. 1500 AD) (Now in the J. Paul Getty Museum) Ancient African society didn't have the huge differences between rich and poor people that plagued Europe and Asia. North Africa, being part of the Mediterranean community, was an exception. But south of the Sahara even kings and queens were not so much richer [...]

Married women in West Asia

By | 2017-09-15T16:26:06+00:00 September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

Grindstone from Syria, about 1500 BC (Louvre Museum) Most married women in West Asia lived with their husband's family, so young married women took orders from their husband's mother. Sometimes the two women got along well; other times they fought the way many teenagers fight with their parents. Some families hit or starved [...]

Girls and young women in West Asia

By | 2017-09-15T15:52:13+00:00 September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

An enslaved woman stands behind a free Elamite woman who is spinning (600s BC) In West Asia, even more than in most other state societies all over the world, men did not allow women to do all the things that men did. People valued women less than men. In Hammurabi's Code, from 1700 BC, there's a lower penalty [...]

Mining and miners in ancient West Asia

By | 2017-09-15T15:48:55+00:00 September 15th, 2017|Economy, West Asia|

Skeleton of a salt miner from Sassanid Iran Mining was a dangerous job. So most people in the ancient world didn't want to do it. This is the skeleton of a young salt miner. Very likely the miner was enslaved, so he didn't have any choice about working in the salt mine. He [...]

West Asian people – families, schools, slavery

By | 2017-09-15T14:13:10+00:00 September 15th, 2017|People, West Asia|

Ur-Nanshe, the king's chief musician in Mari, 2400s BC What we notice most about the way people lived in West Asia is the widespread oppression of women. As compared to their neighbors in Sudan, Egypt, Central Asia, the Roman Empire, or even India, West Asian women were much less likely to become rulers. [...]

Ottoman Empire in the 1700s

By | 2017-09-11T10:47:26+00:00 September 11th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Enderun Library, Topkapi Palace (Istanbul, 1719) By 1703 AD, people were unhappy enough with Feyzullah Efendi that the Sultan killed him. The Sultan's mother, Rabia Gulnus, took charge of the government. Rabia's main worry was Peter the Great's strength in Russia, just north of the Ottoman Empire. In 1710, Rabia had her son declare [...]

Colonization timeline – 1500 AD to modern times

By | 2017-10-13T13:08:47+00:00 September 10th, 2017|Africa, History, When|

Tenochtitlan under attack (painted in the 1600s) Beginning about 1500 AD, Europeans took advantage of new advances in sail technology to invade and take over most of the world beyond Europe. Their colonization had disastrous effects for the people they conquered. The Europeans began by sailing down the Atlantic coast of Africa. They went around Africa to India. And [...]

Aztec gods and rituals – Central American religion

By | 2017-09-09T23:48:53+00:00 September 9th, 2017|Central America, Religion|

The Aztec god of seeds, Xipe Totec (ca 1500 AD) Aztec people, like the people of China, India, or Africa at this time, were polytheistic - they had many gods. Many of these gods were parts of nature. Coatlicue was the god of creation. Xipe Totec was the seeds to be planted, that would grow into food (like Persephone for the Greeks). Tlaloc [...]

Who were the Guarani? South American history

By | 2017-09-09T08:55:29+00:00 September 9th, 2017|History, South America|

Guarani people performing a dance in the 1800s When the first Tupi people expanded their territory from Central America to reach the coast of Brazil about 900 BC, some of them kept on moving south along the Atlantic coast. About a thousand years later, maybe about 1 AD, some of those Tupi people moved inland, abandoning their [...]