radioactivity

Home » radioactivity

American science after colonization

By |2018-04-08T11:21:58+00:00September 28th, 2017|Americas, Native American, North America, Science|

European trade goods (thanks to Nebraska Game and Parks Division) North American people made rapid scientific advances in the course of the 1500s AD, inspired by contacts with traders and explorers from Europe. People learned how to tame horses and ride them, and they learned how to use guns. They also began to use a [...]

Radioactivity and nuclear physics

By |2018-04-24T14:44:18+00:00August 17th, 2017|Physics|

A Japanese girl who lost her hair from radiation sickness from the atomic bomb Americans dropped on Hiroshima Some atoms are naturally radioactive, especially atoms of uranium and plutonium. These atoms have so many protons and neutrons that even the strong nuclear force is barely strong enough to hold them together, and they sometimes lose a proton or a [...]

Radioactivity and sunburns – Physics

By |2018-04-24T12:26:12+00:00August 17th, 2017|Physics|

Radiation from the sun caused this sunburned back The most common kind of radiation is sunlight, and the most common cause of injury from radiation is a sunburn. Just like radioactivity from a nuclear explosion, radiation from the sun can damage the DNA of your cells. Later the same day, or the next day, your skin may be red and sore. [...]

European science in the 1800s

By |2018-04-16T10:32:30+00:00August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, Science|

European boys at school in the 1800s In the first half of the 1800s AD, countries in northern Europe like France and Britain forced India, Ghana, Nigeria, Canada, and other countries to give them food. That meant that many people in northern Europe could stop farming and get an education. Families sent more boys to school than girls, so most of the educated people were [...]

What are igneous rocks? Volcanic stone

By |2018-04-21T11:56:41+00:00June 26th, 2017|Geology|

Obsidian tools Igneous means "fiery", and igneous rocks are rocks that were made by heating them up in a fire. Usually that fire is the big fire inside the earth, under the earth's crust. Inside the earth, radioactivity creates very high temperatures of about 1000 degrees Celsius (that's about 1800 degrees Fahrenheit). Because [...]

What is uranium? Atoms, elements, chemistry

By |2018-04-16T23:49:23+00:00June 2nd, 2017|Chemistry, Physics|

Diagram of a uranium atom Uranium is a rare atom, not just on Earth but also in space and on other planets. There is not very much uranium anywhere. That's because, like lead or gold, uranium only forms inside exploding supernovas. Because uranium atoms have so many protons and neutrons in them, they don't [...]

What is lead? Atoms, elements, chemistry

By |2018-04-24T14:44:10+00:00June 2nd, 2017|Chemistry|

A lump of lead As with all of the other heavier elements, all of the lead in the universe came originally from inside stars. Lead is the heaviest atom that is still stable, with 82 protons and 125 neutrons, just a little heavier than mercury. Unlike many other metals, lead does not conduct electricity [...]

What is helium? Atoms, elements, and chemistry

By |2018-04-01T20:58:53+00:00June 2nd, 2017|Chemistry|

Diagram of a helium atom Helium is a very simple atom. Helium is a simple atom. The nucleus of a helium atom has two protons and two neutrons. Around the nucleus, there are two electrons. The only atom simpler than helium is hydrogen. Stars and helium There are helium atoms inside stars. The star [...]

Dominoes – Uranium chain reaction – Chemisty

By |2018-04-16T17:48:32+00:00June 1st, 2017|Chemistry|

You can't really do an experiment using uranium, because it is radioactive and if you experimented with uranium it would make you sick or kill you. So to see how a chain reaction works, let's play with dominoes instead of uranium atoms - that will be safer. A video showing a domino chain reaction Get [...]