Little Ice Age

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Who built Great Zimbabwe? Central African history

By |2018-04-13T01:39:20+00:00October 2nd, 2017|Africa, History|

Central Africa in the Middle Ages: Great Zimbabwe Iron comes to Central Africa Besides South Africa, central Africa is the most isolated part of Africa - for many years, the people who lived here saw almost nobody from outside their own area. So it took longer for people in Central Africa to find out [...]

West Asian environment – Little Ice Age to global warming

By |2018-04-25T23:04:59+00:00September 11th, 2017|Environment, West Asia|

Iraqi oil production (2000s AD) In the 1500s AD, a global cooling period known as the Little Ice Age affected people all over the world, from the Navajo and Iroquois in North America to the French in Europe and the Mongols in Central Asia. West Asia was no exception. In the Ottoman Empire, after the death of Suleiman the Magnificent, it was very cold and there [...]

Late Middle Ages timeline – 1100-1500 AD

By |2018-04-09T10:31:17+00:00September 10th, 2017|Central Asia, History, When|

The Mongol court (1200s AD) After the warming trend of 1000 AD came a colder period around 1300 AD called the Little Ice Age. Again, people felt the effects around the world. In Central Asia, the Mongols rose to power in the late 1200s AD. They conquered China, Russia, northern India, and most of the Islamic Empire and united them into one huge [...]

Navajo history – Dine – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:37+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Navajo dog today After the ancestors of most Native Americans crossed the Bering Land Bridge, about 12,000 BC, they split up and settled in different parts of North America. The Navajo started out as part of the Athabascans or Dene. Like other Athabascans, they settled in west-central Canada (modern Alberta or Saskatchewan). Sometime around 1300 or [...]

Mississippian period – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:37+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cahokia mound in Illinois, where a Mississippian city was After 800 AD the Mississippian culture developed all along the Mississippi and the Missouri valleys, replacing the earlier Woodland culture. Now many people lived in towns. They built temples and palaces on top of big earth mounds. They had wooden fortification walls around their towns, with [...]

Mississippi People – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:36+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Mississippian warrior About 800 AD, the old Hopewell people seem to have developed what we call the Mississippian culture. People living near the Mississippi river got new kinds of corn about this time. Now, instead of just building burial mounds, people built mounds with flat tops and built buildings on top of the mounds, like a Mayan temple. Some [...]

Iroquois history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:00+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Early Iroquois history: Mohawk pottery Haudenosaunee Early Iroquois history starts when the Iroquois originally came to America with the other Native Americans. They may have first settled around what's now Maryland around 1000 AD. The Iroquois didn't call themselves "Iroquois", which is an Algonquin insult meaning "snakes". They called themselves the "Haudenosaunee", meaning "people who live in [...]

Blackfoot history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:33+00:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Montana landscape with a moose calf wading People we call Athabascans or Dene lived in Blackfoot territory (modern Montana and Canada) in the Paleo-Indian period, by around 10,000 BC. They lived by hunting and gathering. They hunted mammoth, and gathered eggs and wild plants. By 6000 BC, in the Archaic period, the climate warmed up, so the big animals like mammoth became [...]

American geography and environment – Native Americans

By |2018-04-19T11:28:44+00:00August 8th, 2017|Environment, Native American, North America|

North American environment: The north Most of North America was (and is) just not very good for people to live in. That's why not that many people lived in North America before 1500 AD. In the north, it's too cold to support very many people. The winters are too long to grow crops, and there isn't [...]