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Medieval African history – Timbuktu and Great Zimbabwe

By |2018-04-21T12:09:34+00:00October 3rd, 2017|Africa, History|

Mansa Musa of Mali After the 400s AD, the Bantu expansion slowed down. They had already settled most of the good farmland in southern Africa. What was left was mainly desert or thick jungle. It was no good for farming or herding cattle. The Bantu left that land to the Khoikhoi and San people who already lived there. [...]

African clothing history – weaving, knitting, embroidery

By |2018-02-22T13:25:02+00:00October 2nd, 2017|Africa, Clothing|

African clothing history:  An Egyptian painting of Nubians (from modern Sudan), about 1300 BC Weaving comes to Africa By about 2500 BC, some people in Africa started to weave their cloth instead of pounding it, which makes more flexible, comfortable clothing. People buy clothes instead of making them The Egyptians learned from their West Asian neighbors how to weave linen, and very [...]

Medieval African clothing – more and more cotton

By |2018-04-13T01:30:20+00:00October 2nd, 2017|Africa, Clothing|

Cotton cloth made in Gujarat, India andfound in Fustat (Cairo, Egypt) - ca. 800 AD(Now in Oxford, England) People first began to weave cotton in India, also around 2000 BC, but cotton weaving soon spread to Egypt, and all down the east side of Africa. By the 400s AD, the people of Meroe and Kush were growing and weaving cotton for their clothes. Before 800 AD, [...]

Sassanians and the Silk Road – West Asian economy

By |2018-04-25T23:27:00+00:00September 12th, 2017|Economy, West Asia|

Coin of the Sassanian king Hormizd V (ca. 593 AD?) The most important part of the Sassanian economy, as in all other states in Late Antiquity, was farming - most people still were farmers, growing mainly wheat and barley. But most farmers didn't eat the food they grew. They sold their wheat or barley to a mill and used the money [...]

Nader Shah – history of Iran – the 1700s

By |2018-04-25T23:04:48+00:00September 11th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Nader Shah (Iran, 1736-1747) In 1736 AD, Nader Shah overthrew the last Safavid shah and established the country of Iran, with himself as the Shah (king) of Iran. Like Genghis Khan, Nader Shah was from a Turkish family. Apparently he and his mother were captured as slaves by the Uzbeks when he was a child. Like Genghis Khan, Nader Shah [...]

Ancient history timeline: 10,000-4000 BC – the Stone Age

By |2018-04-19T15:03:06+00:00September 10th, 2017|History, West Asia, When|

Ancient history timeline: Building at Gobekli Tepe in what is now  Turkey (ca. 9000 BC) Beginning of farming Around 10,000 BC, with the end of the last major Ice Age, people all over the world - not everyone, but a lot of people - began to shift from fishing and hunting and gathering to farming as their main way of getting food. Farming [...]

Who were the Zapotec? Central American history

By |2018-04-12T08:53:16+00:00September 9th, 2017|Central America, History|

A Zapotec head The Zapotec civilization, like the Maya, grew up in the region that had been ruled by the Olmec, after the collapse of Olmec power about 500 BC. The main city of the Zapotec kings was Monte Alban (in modern Mexico). The Zapotec developed their own hieroglyphic writing system, possibly building on earlier Olmec [...]

Who were the Valdivia people? South American history

By |2018-05-30T17:40:18+00:00September 9th, 2017|History, South America|

Valdivian carving, ca. 3500-2000 BC People probably first reached Ecuador by boat, about 13,000 BC. They were coming down the Pacific Coast from North America. These people settled in river valleys along the coast. They hunted and gathered their food, some on land but mostly by fishing in the ocean. About the same time as people in Asia and Africa, they started farming. Around 8000 BC, they [...]

Who were the Nazca? South American history

By |2018-04-12T08:53:14+00:00September 9th, 2017|History, South America|

Nazca lines - a giant monkey drawn on the desert floor After the Chavin state collapsed about 250 BC, two new states formed in Peru - the Moche in the north and the Nazca in the south. So by about 100 BC, the Nazca were between the Moche and the Mapuche to their south, in what is now Chile, and [...]

Who were the Inca? South American history

By |2018-04-12T08:53:12+00:00September 9th, 2017|History, South America|

Macchu Picchu Until the 1400s AD, the Pacific coast of South America was made up of a lot of small independent kingdoms: first the Valdivia and Norte Chico people, then the Moche, the Chavin and the Mapuche. These kingdoms often raided each other, but then they went home again and made peace. This was like the city-states of ancient Greece, or the Etruscan period in Italy. Then one [...]