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Lewis and Clark – American history

By |2017-08-13T17:28:54+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, North America|

Lewis and Clark In 1804 AD, the Sioux people received a visit from official representatives of the newly formed United States government. The visitors' names were Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Both of them had already killed many Native Americans. Mostly they had killed Shawnee. They were fighting to take Shawnee land in the Appalachians. The Sioux didn't [...]

The Crow get horses – American history

By |2018-04-08T11:21:54+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Crow men In the 1600s AD, Crow people were still living in the Dakotas. But they caught smallpox and measles from their neighbors, the Mandan, and many Crow people died. So even though they had not yet met any Europeans, Crow people's lives were still very much changed by European settlers. Crow people met Europeans for the first time in [...]

Cree and smallpox – American history

By |2018-04-19T11:29:05+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Cree man In the 1500s AD, people who called themselves the Eenou lived in the northern part of North America, around what is now the border between the United States and Canada. Modern historians call them the Cree. They mostly lived in the forests of what is now Minnesota and Wisconsin. Their language was [...]

Comanche history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:40:21+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

Comanche women (1800s) From Shoshone to Comanche Pueblo people captured Spanish horses in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 AD, and they sold some of those horses to the Shoshone, in what is now Wyoming. The Shoshone who had horses split off from the other Shoshone. They called themselves the Nermernuh, but their Ute neighbors called them the Comanche. [...]

Blackfoot get horses – American history

By |2018-04-08T11:21:53+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

Blackfoot man with horse Throughout the 1500s and 1600s AD, the Blackfoot continued to live in the same way they had lived before 1500. But the lives of Blackfoot people changed a lot in about 1730 AD, when they got horses from other North American tribes. Once they had horses, they could hunt bison and get their food more easily [...]

Woodland period Native American history

By |2018-10-05T06:52:43+00:00August 10th, 2017|History, Native American|

Early Anasazi (Pueblo) pottery from about 550-800 AD Early Woodland The third period of North American history, after the Archaic period, is the Woodland period. What happened in the Archaic period? More Native American articles The Early Woodland period began in the southern and midwestern part of North America about 1200 BC. People like [...]

Mississippian period – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:37+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cahokia mound in Illinois, where a Mississippian city was After 800 AD the Mississippian culture developed all along the Mississippi and the Missouri valleys, replacing the earlier Woodland culture. Now many people lived in towns. They built temples and palaces on top of big earth mounds. They had wooden fortification walls around their towns, with [...]

Blackfoot history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:33+00:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Montana landscape with a moose calf wading People we call Athabascans or Dene lived in Blackfoot territory (modern Montana and Canada) in the Paleo-Indian period, by around 10,000 BC. They lived by hunting and gathering. They hunted mammoth, and gathered eggs and wild plants. By 6000 BC, in the Archaic period, the climate warmed up, so the big animals like mammoth became [...]

Algonquin history – Early Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:32+00:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Algonquin history: Algonquin arrowhead from about 1 AD. It's made from stone imported from south of the Great Lakes From Athabascan to Algonquin Algonquin tradition says that people who called themselves Algonquins first lived along the Atlantic Coast, in the north-eastern part of North America, north of the Iroquois and south of the Inuit (in modern Canada). [...]

Native Americans get horses and donkeys

By |2018-04-19T14:24:03+00:00June 20th, 2017|Native American, North America|

A Cheyenne man named Yellow Horse captures a herd of mules (Cheyenne drawing, about 1870). There had been no horses in North America since about 5600 BC, when buffalos ate their grass and then Native Americans (probably) hunted them (and camels) to extinction. But just after 1500 AD, horses returned when Spanish explorers brought [...]