Harappan period Indian art

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Dancing woman from Mohenjo Daro, in what is now Pakistan

Dancing woman from Mohenjo Daro, in what is now Pakistan

By the Bronze Age, around 2000 BC, people in northern India were richer, because they were trading more with West Asia and Central Asia. They could afford to build cities. And they could afford to make more expensive art than their Stone Age ancestors at Mehrgahr.

Harappan pottery from the Indus Valley, about 2000 BC

Harappan pottery from the Indus Valley, about 2000 BC

Harappan artists made bronze statuettes (little statues) like this dancing woman. She’s totally Indian. She’s way more of an independent person than any women in West Asian art at this time. They made pottery decorated with painted rows of flowers and animals, like West Asian pottery. They carved small stone statues, too.

Learn by doing: go see Indian art in a museum
More about Ancient Indian art

Bibliography and further reading about Indian art

Eyewitness India Ancient India Indian art Indian art

Eyewitness India, by Manini Chatterjee (2002). Easy reading. It’s not specifically about Indian art, but you’ll find information about Indian art in this book.

Ancient India, by Virginia Schomp (2005). Written for teens. Again, not specifically about Indian art, but very good for reports, and there is information about Indian art.

Indian Art (Oxford History of Art), by Partha Mitter (2001). A good survey of Indian art for ordinary people, going from ancient India to modern India.

Indian Art, by Vidya Dehejia (1997). Also written for adults. The author’s the curator of Indian art at the Smithsonian Institution. She emphasizes the close relationship between Indian art and religion.

More about Ancient India
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By | 2017-07-19T18:10:56+00:00 July 19th, 2017|History|0 Comments
Cite this page: Carr, K.E. Harappan period Indian art. Quatr.us Study Guides, July 19, 2017. Web. January 19, 2018.

About the Author:

Karen Carr
Karen Carr is Associate Professor Emerita, Department of History, Portland State University. She holds a doctorate in Classical Art and Archaeology from the University of Michigan. Follow her on Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter, or buy her book, Vandals to Visigoths.

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