Sassanians

/Tag: Sassanians

West Asian mathematics – history of math

By |2018-05-10T10:12:08-07:00September 16th, 2017|Science, West Asia|

History of math: Sumerian multiplication table (2700 BC) Cuneiform multiplication table Once people in West Asia figured out how to write down numbers, about 3500 BC, they quickly began to want to use cuneiform to write down other mathematical ideas. (Read more about the invention of numbers) The earliest example of this that we have is from about 2700 BC. It [...]

Zoroastrianism – Iran – West Asian religion

By |2018-06-11T18:34:59-07:00September 15th, 2017|Religion, West Asia|

An Iranian fire sacrifice Zoroaster/Zarathustra himself Around 1000 BC (probably), about the same time that people in India were writing the Rig Veda, a man named Zoroaster (also called Zarathustra) was a priest in a small temple in the eastern part of West Asia, in an area with a lot of small kingdoms and no major power. Zoroaster believed that [...]

Who were the Sassanians? Iran – West Asian history

By |2018-04-15T12:09:26-07:00September 14th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Ardashir, the first ruler of the Sassanians Rulers of the Parthian Empire In 211 AD, a group of Iranians called the Sassanians (the descendants of Sassan) took over control of the Parthian Empire from the Parthians. The Sassanians were proud of their Persian heritage, and they wanted to re-establish the borders of the old Iranian empire. This meant reconquering [...]

Sassanians and the Silk Road – West Asian economy

By |2018-04-25T23:27:00-07:00September 12th, 2017|Economy, West Asia|

Coin of the Sassanian king Hormizd V (ca. 593 AD?) The most important part of the Sassanian economy, as in all other states in Late Antiquity, was farming - most people still were farmers, growing mainly wheat and barley. But most farmers didn't eat the food they grew. They sold their wheat or barley to a mill and used the money [...]

West Asian economy – Mesopotamia and Iran

By |2018-04-25T23:26:59-07:00September 12th, 2017|Economy, West Asia|

Obsidian tools West Asia is located in the middle of the very wide land mass we call Europe and Asia and Africa, and so it has always played an important part in moving things from east to west and from west to east. Beginning as early as the Stone Age, about 7000 BC, people in West [...]

Roman army from the Republic to the fall of Rome

By |2019-03-22T08:39:21-07:00September 5th, 2017|Romans, War|

Testudo formation on the Column of Trajan, Rome What did the Roman army do? The Roman army fought many wars over the long history of the Roman Empire. For hundreds of years they won pretty much all of their wars. In the early days of the Roman Republic, they beat the Etruscans. Then they beat [...]

Constantius and Julian – Later Roman Empire

By |2019-04-23T21:36:54-07:00September 3rd, 2017|History, Romans|

The Roman emperor Constantius II, son of Constantine Constantine II, Constantius, and Constans The Roman emperor Constantine died in his 60s in 337 AD. His three surviving sons split the Empire among them, but they soon fought among themselves, and with rebels in Gaul (France). There was a big civil war. Who was Constantine? [...]

Who were the Nestorians? History of Christianity

By |2017-08-22T17:18:53-07:00August 22nd, 2017|Religion, Romans|

A Nestorian cross on a tombstone from Kazakhstan (1300s AD) In 428 AD, when Pulcheria and Eudocia were running the Roman Empire, a bishop named Nestorius became the Patriarch of Constantinople. That's like being the Pope but for people in the Eastern Empire. Nestorius didn't like the idea that Jesus was both a man and a god at the same time. Nestorius thought [...]

What did Manichaeans believe? – Christianity

By |2018-03-19T11:55:23-07:00August 22nd, 2017|Religion, West Asia|

Manichaean painting (Turfan, western China, ca. 900s AD) The prophet Mani in the Sassanian Empire In the 300s and 400s AD many Christians turned to believing in Manichaeism, a form of Christianity. A man named Mani started this movement in the late 200s AD. Mani lived in the Sassanian Empire, where lots of people were Zoroastrians. So Zoroastrianism [...]

Great Persecution – History of Christianity

By |2019-07-15T17:21:25-07:00August 21st, 2017|Religion, Romans|

The Roman emperor Diocletian, who organized the Great Persecution of Christians. (This statue would have been painted and not white.) Diocletian's policies The Roman Emperor Diocletian came to power in 284 AD. Diocletian was an army general. So he felt that a lot of the empire's problems could be solved by not allowing so much freedom. [...]