Menelaus

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Judgment of Paris – Trojan War

By |2018-04-23T13:41:07+00:00July 16th, 2017|Greeks, Literature|

Judgment of Paris -Paris is on the right (A fresco from Pompeii, ca. 79 AD) Who is the most beautiful? Once upon a time, around 1250 BC, toward the end of the Bronze Age in Greece, three goddesses were having an argument (said the Greeks). The goddesses Aphrodite, Athena, and Hera were arguing about which one of them was the most beautiful. [...]

Menelaus and Helen – Trojan War

By |2018-04-23T09:02:50+00:00July 15th, 2017|Greeks, Literature|

Menelaus and Helen lived in Sparta  Menelaus was the son of Atreus, so he was also the younger brother of Agamemnon. The older brother, Agamemnon, inherited his father's kingdom at Mycenae. So Menelaus didn't have a kingdom. Instead, he competed with everyone else and won the contest to marry Helen. Helen was the daughter of the [...]

Iphigeneia in Aulis – Euripides – ancient Greece

By |2018-04-23T11:42:46+00:00July 15th, 2017|Greeks, Literature|

Iphigeneia brought to the sacrifice (Pompeii, ca. 79 AD) When Helen ran off with Paris, her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta, was very upset. He went to visit his older brother, Agamemnon (ag-a-MEM-non), the king of Mycenae. Menelaus reminded Agamemnon about the oath that all the suitors swore when they were fighting over who would marry Helen. Menelaus insisted that his brother call [...]

Helen of Troy – the Trojan War

By |2018-04-23T10:13:18+00:00July 15th, 2017|Greeks, Literature|

Kidnapping Helen of Troy (from Pompeii) Helen, the daughter of Zeus and the queen of Sparta, was the most beautiful young woman in the world. She lived in Sparta with her mother and her father, the king of Sparta, and her half-sister, Clytemnestra. All the young men wanted to marry Helen. Helen's stepfather (the king of Sparta) was afraid that if he [...]

Xenia – guests and hosts in ancient Greece

By |2018-04-23T10:13:16+00:00July 12th, 2017|Greeks, People|

Kidnapping Helen of Troy (from Pompeii) In ancient Greece, xenia meant "the way you treat strangers or foreigners". It comes from a very old Proto-Indo-European (Yamnaya) word that means "stranger" but also "guest" and "host" and "foreigner" and sometimes "enemy". Do those words all seem very different to you? That's the point they're [...]

Plot of the Trojan Women – Euripides

By |2018-04-23T10:13:18+00:00July 11th, 2017|Greeks, Literature|

Cassandra dragged away from the altar (House of Menander, Pompeii, ca. 70 AD) Euripides lived in ancient Athens. He wrote the Trojan Women in 415 BC during the Peloponnesian War. This was just after the Athenians had killed every man on the island of Melos, and enslaved all the women and children. The play [...]