Cicero

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Roman philosophy – ancient Rome

By |2018-04-24T11:41:37+00:00September 4th, 2017|Philosophy, Romans|

A Roman man making a speech (Florence, about 50 BC) Thanks to VROMA for the image Romans meet Greek philosophy Roman men didn't begin studying philosophy until about 200 BC. At that time, the Romans were conquering Greece. So a lot of Roman soldiers and generals spent a lot of time in Greece, and got a chance to talk [...]

Cicero – Stoicism – Roman philosophy

By |2018-04-18T17:19:14+00:00September 4th, 2017|Philosophy, Romans|

Bust of Cicero (Capitoline Museum, Rome) In the last years of the Roman Republic, great men like Julius Caesar and Pompey fought over which of them would rule Rome. Cicero was one of the last men to stand up for the old Republic. He tried to keep the republican government going. While you might think [...]

Latin Literature – the writers of ancient Rome

By |2018-04-25T10:12:51+00:00September 3rd, 2017|Literature, Romans|

A Roman papyrus scroll from a library of Epicurean philosophy (Herculaneum, Italy) The Roman Empire lasted for more than a thousand years, so there was plenty of time to produce a lot of writing. Latin, an Indo-European language, was written in an alphabet derived from the Greek alphabet, with some letters changed: the Latin or Roman alphabet is [...]

Stoics – Greek and Roman philosophy

By |2018-04-18T17:19:14+00:00August 16th, 2017|Greeks, Philosophy|

Cicero, a Roman philosopher The Stoics were a group of philosophers who first began teaching their ideas in the Hellenistic period. Stoicism was founded by a man named Zeno, who lived from 335-263 BC. He was friendly with the successors of Alexander who ruled Greece. Zeno lived in Athens, which was a great center of learning. He used to [...]

Ancient philosophy: ethics, fate, and science

By |2018-04-24T11:55:01+00:00August 16th, 2017|Philosophy|

Weighing the souls of the dead Philosophy means the love of wisdom. But what does that mean? It's hard to separate philosophy from religion. And it's also hard to draw a line between philosophy and science and mathematics. All of these are parts of people's search to make order out of nature. They're a way of [...]

Niccolo Machiavelli – The Prince – Florence

By |2018-04-08T11:14:28+00:00August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, Philosophy|

Niccolo Machiavelli Around 1500 AD, Machiavelli was working for the government in the city-state of Florence. Florence was smack in the middle of the Renaissance, which meant that everybody in Florence was thinking and talking about how cool ancient Rome was. After the Medicis tortured him and pushed him out of power in 1513, Machiavelli began writing books [...]

European writing – books, poetry, Bibles

By |2018-04-11T18:19:12+00:00August 6th, 2017|History, Modern Europe|

Reproduction of a press from Gutenberg's time The invention of the European printing press with moveable type in northern Europe in the late 1400s AD was no accident: publishers had set out to find a way to create a lot of books cheaply, because there was a new market for the books. More and more European families [...]

Boccaccio – Decameron – Medieval literature

By |2018-04-24T09:23:18+00:00August 3rd, 2017|Literature, Medieval|

Florence, Italy Most of the people who knew how to write in the early Middle Ages were monks. So most of them wrote about serious things like God and Heaven and Hell. Even writers who weren't monks, like Dante, usually wrote about Christian ideas. But Boccaccio was different. Boccaccio wrote about real people and their real lives. Some [...]

Damon and Pythias – an ancient Greek friendship

By |2018-07-08T00:42:27+00:00July 9th, 2017|Greeks, Literature|

Places Damon and Pythias might have been: The Greek theater at Syracuse in Sicily Best friends in Sicily According to the Greek story, Damon and Pythias grew up in Sicily, and they were always best friends. One day when the two of them were visiting the city of Syracuse Pythias said some things [...]