Architecture

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Etruscan architecture – Early Italy

By |2019-05-31T18:00:00-07:00August 26th, 2017|Architecture, Religion|

Etruscan temple at Veii - a reconstruction When did Etruscans start to build in stone? The Etruscans, about 700 BC, were the first people in northern and central Italy to build big buildings out of stone. They learned from the Greeks and the Phoenicians to build big stone temples for their gods. Who were the Etruscans? Archaic Greek architecture Carthaginian [...]

Domitian’s palace – Domus Flavia – Roman architecture

By |2019-05-15T05:48:39-07:00August 26th, 2017|Architecture, Romans|

This is the facade, or front entrance, to Domitian's palace, the Domus Flavia Why did Domitian build the Domus Flavia? Vespasian, the first emperor of the Flavian Dynasty in Rome, had been popular because he lived plainly and acted like he was equal to everyone else. The Flavian Emperors The Colosseum Roman architecture All our [...]

Roman Colosseum – ancient Rome – Roman architecture

By |2019-04-27T09:29:32-07:00August 26th, 2017|Architecture, Romans|

Roman Colosseum - the Flavian Amphitheater - in Rome, Italy. Built about 70 AD Vespasian built the Roman Colosseum so people would like him When Vespasian became the new Roman Emperor in 69 AD, he wanted everyone to know that he cared about the people. He was going to take care of them and not [...]

Cerveteri – Etruscan tomb architecture

By |2019-03-12T05:05:23-07:00August 25th, 2017|Architecture, Religion|

A street in the Etruscan cemetery at Cerveteri An Etruscan cemetery The Etruscans (ee-TRUSS-cans) of Northern Italy believed that it was important to keep cemeteries well separated from where people lived. You could not bury anyone inside the sacred boundary of the city (the pomerium). Who are the Etruscans? Villanovans (before the Etruscans) All our [...]

Baths of Caracalla – Roman architecture

By |2019-02-11T06:57:11-07:00August 25th, 2017|Architecture, Romans|

Baths of Caracalla A good example of a Roman bath Roman emperors often built huge public bath buildings for the people of Rome to enjoy. The largest one, and one that also happens to be very well preserved so we can still see it today, was the one built by the Emperor Caracalla, about 200 AD. When you first [...]

Roman baths – water and cleanliness in ancient Rome

By |2019-02-11T06:42:24-07:00August 25th, 2017|Architecture, Romans|

The big cold swimming pool at the Baths of Caracalla in Rome. Why did Romans have public baths? Roman people usually didn't have hot baths in their houses, because it was too hard to heat up the water. And people who lived in cities had to live in small apartments, often a whole family in [...]

Roman basilicas – Architecture in ancient Rome

By |2019-02-13T17:46:36-07:00August 25th, 2017|Architecture, Government, Romans|

Basilica Aemilia, Rome What is a basilica? Sometimes the Romans had things they wanted to do in groups, but inside, out of the weather. Then they met in a basilica (ba-SILL-uh-ka). The word comes from the Greek word basileus, meaning a king. So a basilica started out as the king's hall. Probably the [...]

Roman amphitheaters – ancient Rome

By |2019-01-25T05:14:50-07:00August 25th, 2017|Architecture, Romans|

The Colosseum - the Flavian Amphitheater - in Rome, Italy. Built in the 70s AD by the emperor Vespasian What were Roman amphitheaters for? Most people have heard of the Colosseum in Rome, but there were many other amphitheaters all over the Roman Empire. The first gladiatorial fights, in Etruscan times, were held anywhere that there was a flat [...]

Northern France with kids!

By |2019-06-12T13:59:55-07:00August 15th, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|

Amiens labyrinth: Northern France with Kids Day One: Bayeux Tapestry In northern France, drive first from Paris to Bayeux to see the Bayeux Tapestry. There are good audioguides for both adults and kids. Going through all the panels of the tapestry is as interesting as reading comic strips! Norman conquest The Vikings Paris for Kids All [...]

American public buildings – Architecture

By |2018-04-19T11:29:03-07:00August 10th, 2017|Architecture, History, North America|

Iroquois longhouse In 1500 AD, the most important areas in North America for building public buildings were the Pueblo nation in the southwest, the Mississipian culture all along the Mississippi valley, the Cherokee nation in the southeast, and the Iroquois nation in the northeast. People in the Pueblo nation built mainly in adobe. San Miguel mission church (Santa Fe, 1600s) [...]