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Third Dynasty of Ur – Mesopotamia – West Asian history

By |2018-04-25T23:49:52+00:00September 14th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Standard of Ur This is the Middle Bronze Age in West Asia, about 2100 BC to 1700 BC. It corresponds roughly to the First Intermediate Period in Egypt, and just as in Egypt this was a time when West Asia was broken up into a lot of little kingdoms instead of being one big empire. In Greece, [...]

The Jews and the Levant – West Asian history

By |2018-04-25T23:49:08+00:00September 14th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Tel Kabri, a Canaanite palace ca. 1600 BC By the end of the Stone Age, the people who would eventually become known as the Hebrews, and then the Jews, were mostly settled down in villages, farming, though some of them may have been nomadic shepherds like Abraham and Isaac in the Bible. During the Bronze Age, the people living in Israel, [...]

Amorites – Mesopotamia – West Asian history

By |2018-04-25T23:48:13+00:00September 13th, 2017|History, West Asia|

History of the Amorites: an Amorite jug, about 2200 BC Where did the Amorites live? About 2400 BC, the Amorites were living in what is now southern Turkey and Syria. Amorites means "westerners" in Sumerian, and that makes sense because the Amorites lived to the west of Sumer. They spoke a Semitic language, and lived partly [...]

Joseph and Egypt – Bible stories

By |2017-10-09T17:15:42+00:00August 24th, 2017|Religion, West Asia|

Joseph dreams and gets put in the well, then talks to Pharaoh (Egypt, 500s AD, cloth) According to the Bible, Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah. Isaac married Rebecca. And they had two sons, Jacob and Esau (EE-sow). And Jacob married two women (this was allowed then), Rachel and Leah, who were sisters. Jacob [...]

Cree and smallpox – American history

By |2018-04-19T11:29:05+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Cree man In the 1500s AD, people who called themselves the Eenou lived in the northern part of North America, around what is now the border between the United States and Canada. Modern historians call them the Cree. They mostly lived in the forests of what is now Minnesota and Wisconsin. Their language was [...]

Early Shoshone history – Native Americans

By |2018-05-17T14:44:28+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Snake River, where the early Shoshone fished. Where did the Shoshone come from? The Shoshone people's ancestors were the Cochise culture. They lived in the southwest of North America about 8000 BC. With the end of the last Ice Age, the southwest got too dry to support everybody, and the culture split up. Related [...]

Early Paiute history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:38+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Strawberry Lake, in southern Oregon The Paiute, like the Shoshone, are descended from the Cochise culture. The Cochise lived in North America's southwest about 8000 BC. With the end of the last Ice Age, the southwest got too dry to support everybody. So the Cochise split up. The ancestors of the Paiute, the Shoshone, the Aztecs, and [...]

Native American architecture

By |2018-04-08T11:23:09+00:00August 7th, 2017|Architecture, Native American|

Replica of Cherokee winter house What kind of house you lived in depended a lot on where you lived, and how you lived. Many people were nomadic, travelling around with their dogs following the buffalo they hunted on the Great Plains. These people lived mainly in tipis, which were very large tents made of long wooden poles covered [...]

The Avars – Early Middle Ages

By |2018-03-21T15:11:55+00:00August 2nd, 2017|History, Medieval|

Grasslands of Central Asia - the steppe homeland of the Avars Ruled by the Rouran The Avars were a mostly Turkic group of people. We first hear of them living in Central Asia under the rule of the Rouran, in the 400s AD. The Chinese, who lived to their south-east, called the Avars the Juan-Juan. Like other Central [...]

The Yamnaya and the Indo-European language family

By |2018-04-21T13:20:00+00:00July 27th, 2017|Central Asia, History|

Yamnaya get around: Map of the spread of Indo-European languages Who were the Yamnaya? People we call the Yamnaya (Ukrainian for "People who lived in pits") seem to have been speaking an early version of the Indo-European language at least as early as 5000 BC in the area between the Black Sea and the Caspian [...]