Mississippian

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Woodland period Native American history

By |2018-10-05T06:52:43+00:00August 10th, 2017|History, Native American|

Early Anasazi (Pueblo) pottery from about 550-800 AD Early Woodland The third period of North American history, after the Archaic period, is the Woodland period. What happened in the Archaic period? More Native American articles The Early Woodland period began in the southern and midwestern part of North America about 1200 BC. People like [...]

Mississippian period – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:24:37+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cahokia mound in Illinois, where a Mississippian city was After 800 AD the Mississippian culture developed all along the Mississippi and the Missouri valleys, replacing the earlier Woodland culture. Now many people lived in towns. They built temples and palaces on top of big earth mounds. They had wooden fortification walls around their towns, with [...]

Cherokee history – Native American history

By |2018-04-07T17:05:33+00:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cherokee history: statues from Etowah (now northern Georgia) from about 1300 AD The Ani Chota The Cherokee nation was the largest nation of eastern North America.  They were probably also the most important. But they did not call themselves the Cherokee. They called themselves the Ani Chota. That means the people of Chota, [...]

Native American games – lacrosse, swimming, dice

By |2018-04-11T18:30:20+00:00August 8th, 2017|Games, Native American|

Cherokee lacrosse players from 1888 People who lived in North America played both active games and the kind where you can sit down. Their favorite active game was lacrosse. Or actually lacrosse and a lot of other games that you play with a stick and a ball, with rules that were different in different parts [...]

Cherokee economy – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:26+00:00August 8th, 2017|Economy, Native American|

Cherokee fishing weir on the Little Tennessee River in Macon County. (Thanks to Ralph Preston) People who lived in the Cherokee nation got their meat from hunting and fishing, and from gathering shellfish, and their corn and beans and squash from farming. Usually men did the hunting and fishing. They built little rock walls in the water - fishing weirs - [...]

Early Cherokee clothing – Native American history

By |2018-05-23T18:18:35+00:00August 8th, 2017|Clothing, Native American|

Early Cherokee clothing: Tsiyu Gansini, Cherokee chief (late 1700s AD) Cherokee hairstyles Like most people, Cherokee people used their clothing and hairstyles to show that they were Cherokee and different from their neighbors. What made Cherokee men look different from other people living in North America at this time was their haircuts. Cherokee men shaved [...]

Cherokee art and Cherokee pottery

By |2018-04-07T17:05:24+00:00August 8th, 2017|Art, Native American|

Swannanona pottery (ca. 1000 BC) Even before Cherokee people first came to the southeast, the Woodland people who were living there were making baskets and pottery. Their earliest pottery looks a lot like baskets and probably came from making clay-linedwaterproof baskets to store things in. Cherokee basket from the 1700s AD When Cherokee people first split off from the Iroquois about 1500 BC and settled [...]

Sharecroppers and cotton – American History

By |2018-04-18T18:43:37+00:00June 8th, 2017|Clothing, North America|

Sharecroppers and cotton: Cotton pickers in the 1800s AD Slavery and the cotton gin The invention of the cotton gin in 1793 AD made it possible for enslaved people to produce cotton cheaply enough so cotton was now the cheapest kind of cloth. Tens of thousands of black people worked hard as slaves [...]

History of Pottery – Clay Pottery

By |2018-04-15T16:50:57+00:00May 25th, 2017|Art, China, Japan|

History of pottery: Philistine pottery (compare Mycenaean Greek pottery) Pottery is dishes, plates, cups, cooking pots, and storage jars made out of clay. People make dishes and pots out of clay for several reasons. Clay is cheap and easy to get, pretty much anybody can make a useful pot out of it, and you [...]