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Medieval African history – Timbuktu and Great Zimbabwe

By |2018-04-21T12:09:34+00:00October 3rd, 2017|Africa, History|

Mansa Musa of Mali After the 400s AD, the Bantu expansion slowed down. They had already settled most of the good farmland in southern Africa. What was left was mainly desert or thick jungle. It was no good for farming or herding cattle. The Bantu left that land to the Khoikhoi and San people who already lived there. [...]

American science after colonization

By |2018-04-08T11:21:58+00:00September 28th, 2017|Americas, Native American, North America, Science|

European trade goods (thanks to Nebraska Game and Parks Division) North American people made rapid scientific advances in the course of the 1500s AD, inspired by contacts with traders and explorers from Europe. People learned how to tame horses and ride them, and they learned how to use guns. They also began to use a [...]

Amorites – Mesopotamia – West Asian history

By |2018-04-25T23:48:13+00:00September 13th, 2017|History, West Asia|

History of the Amorites: an Amorite jug, about 2200 BC Where did the Amorites live? About 2400 BC, the Amorites were living in what is now southern Turkey and Syria. Amorites means "westerners" in Sumerian, and that makes sense because the Amorites lived to the west of Sumer. They spoke a Semitic language, and lived partly [...]

West Asian games – Mesopotamia and Iran

By |2018-04-25T23:40:39+00:00September 13th, 2017|Games, West Asia|

Earliest known dice (Iran, ca. 2600 BC) See that the six is already opposite the one, as on modern dice? But check out this Harappan die. The people of West Asia really liked gambling games. The earliest dice in the world are from a backgammon set from ancient Persia (modern Iran), from about 3000 BC. Backgammon probably came from even [...]

Roman chariot-racing – Circus games in Ancient Rome

By |2018-01-14T14:06:37+00:00September 1st, 2017|Games, Romans|

Roman circus games: Roman chariot-racing mosaic from Vienne, France Chariot-racing and gambling In addition to gladiatorial games, people in ancient Rome also really loved chariot-racing.  Both men and women went to the races all the time. They bet on which horses would win. Chariot races were actually even more popular than the gladiatorial games. Roman [...]

Ghost Dance – Native American religion

By |2017-08-14T14:33:35+00:00August 14th, 2017|History|

Wovoka, a Paiute man By the late 1800s AD, the United States and Canadian armies forced most of the people who had hunted bison on the Great Plains to move to reservations. The reservations were on terrible land. They were deserts with no water. And now that the bison had all been killed, people had no way to [...]

Ute get horses – American history

By |2017-08-14T09:57:14+00:00August 14th, 2017|History|

Utes riding horses in the 1800s AD During the 1500s AD, the Utes had not yet seen any European invaders. They were still living in Utah and Colorado the way they had been living before. In the 1630s, a few Spanish explorers came to Ute territory and so people saw white men for the first [...]

Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee – Sioux history

By |2018-05-21T17:09:53+00:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Sioux history - Red Elk Woman, a member of the Sioux When did the Sioux first meet Europeans? In the 1500s and 1600s AD, Sioux people were still living around the Great Lakes (modern Minnesota). That's where they were in 1667 when they first met French fur traders. (Read about the early Sioux) When did the [...]

The Shoshone fight the United States

By |2018-05-17T16:30:44+00:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shoshone history: a Shoshone woman and baby The Shoshone get horses After the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 AD, some Shoshone people in Wyoming bought horses. These horse-riders split off from the other Shoshone and became the Comanche. At that point, Shoshone history becomes separate from Comanche history. (Read more about the Comanche) The rest of the Shoshone still [...]

Pueblo Revolt – American history

By |2017-08-13T22:57:06+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Francisco Vasquez de Coronado In 1500 AD, people of the Pueblo nation had recently left their usual land, probably because of a long drought, and moved south and west to the valley of the Rio Grande. It was in the Rio Grande valley that they first met the Spanish invaders. Marcos de Niza, a Franciscan friar, [...]