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Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee – Sioux history

By |2018-05-21T17:09:53+00:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Sioux history - Red Elk Woman, a member of the Sioux When did the Sioux first meet Europeans? In the 1500s and 1600s AD, Sioux people were still living around the Great Lakes (modern Minnesota). That's where they were in 1667 when they first met French fur traders. (Read about the early Sioux) When did the [...]

The Crow get horses – American history

By |2018-04-08T11:21:54+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Crow men In the 1600s AD, Crow people were still living in the Dakotas. But they caught smallpox and measles from their neighbors, the Mandan, and many Crow people died. So even though they had not yet met any Europeans, Crow people's lives were still very much changed by European settlers. Crow people met Europeans for the first time in [...]

Cree and smallpox – American history

By |2018-04-19T11:29:05+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Cree man In the 1500s AD, people who called themselves the Eenou lived in the northern part of North America, around what is now the border between the United States and Canada. Modern historians call them the Cree. They mostly lived in the forests of what is now Minnesota and Wisconsin. Their language was [...]

Cheyenne and cholera – American history

By |2018-04-24T10:40:36+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

Cheyenne with horses (Cheyenne painting on bison hide, 1800s) In 1680 AD, Cheyenne people were living around the sources of the Mississippi River (in modern Minnesota), when they sent representatives to meet with French fur traders at La Salle's fort and urge them to come to their country, where there were plenty of animals for fur trapping. [...]

American geography and environment – Native Americans

By |2018-04-19T11:28:44+00:00August 8th, 2017|Environment, Native American, North America|

North American environment: The north Most of North America was (and is) just not very good for people to live in. That's why not that many people lived in North America before 1500 AD. In the north, it's too cold to support very many people. The winters are too long to grow crops, and there isn't [...]

Native Americans get horses and donkeys

By |2018-04-19T14:24:03+00:00June 20th, 2017|Native American, North America|

A Cheyenne man named Yellow Horse captures a herd of mules (Cheyenne drawing, about 1870). There had been no horses in North America since about 5600 BC, when buffalos ate their grass and then Native Americans (probably) hunted them (and camels) to extinction. But just after 1500 AD, horses returned when Spanish explorers brought [...]