elevation

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31 07, 2017

Westminster Abbey – London

By |2017-07-31T10:53:24-07:00July 31st, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|0 Comments

Westminster Abbey western facade (front) Westminster Abbey is a large church in the Gothic style in London, England. Edward the Confessor built an abbey here in 1050 AD, in the Romanesque style. (An abbey is a place for monks or nuns to live and pray) William the Conqueror was crowned in the Abbey. And since his time all English kings and queens have also been crowned [...]

31 07, 2017

Inside Notre Dame – Paris, France

By |2019-04-16T12:41:12-07:00July 31st, 2017|History|0 Comments

Notre Dame of Paris nave Building the apse of Notre Dame After they had pretty much finished the nave of Notre Dame of Paris, the builders worked on the crossing. Then they started on the apse. They finished the apse in 1182 AD, and the nave in 1196. What is an apse? Start of Notre [...]

31 07, 2017

Notre Dame of Paris – Medieval Cathedral

By |2019-04-16T12:33:32-07:00July 31st, 2017|History|0 Comments

Notre Dame of Paris (1160s AD) Why did Sully build Notre Dame? It was 1160 AD, a hundred years after Matilda built the Abbaye aux Dames in Caen, and about the same time as they were building the new cathedral at Laon. The Bishop of Paris, Maurice de Sully, decided that Paris should also have a big [...]

30 07, 2017

Parts of a Church – Architecture

By |2019-04-03T17:48:14-07:00July 30th, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|0 Comments

Notre Dame of Paris (1160s AD) The shape of a cross Medieval architects designed most Romanesque and Gothic churches starting with the design of a Roman basilica. But many churches added a part coming out crossways. That made the whole church take the shape of a cross. Roman basilicas Medieval architecture All our medieval Europe articles What is [...]

30 07, 2017

Chartres cathedral – inside the church

By |2019-03-16T09:35:19-07:00July 30th, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|1 Comment

Chartres nave Inside Chartres cathedral The architect started from the west end of the cathedral, at the nave. The builders built the nave very tall, the highest in France at that time - 120 feet. And, to keep the church from burning down again, they put on a stone roof instead of a wooden one. [...]