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The Shoshone fight the United States

By |2018-05-17T16:30:44+00:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shoshone history: a Shoshone woman and baby The Shoshone get horses After the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 AD, some Shoshone people in Wyoming bought horses. These horse-riders split off from the other Shoshone and became the Comanche. At that point, Shoshone history becomes separate from Comanche history. (Read more about the Comanche) The rest of the Shoshone still [...]

Pueblo Revolt – American history

By |2018-10-02T06:35:15+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

The causes of the Pueblo Revolt: Francisco Vasquez de Coronado Pueblo people move to the Rio Grande In 1500 AD, people of the Pueblo nation had recently left their usual land, probably because of a long drought, and moved south and west to the valley of the Rio Grande. Early history of the Pueblo people [...]

United States Independence – American history

By |2018-04-19T11:29:06+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American, North America|

Rock Art from Utah, about 1700 AD In the 1700s AD, most of North America was still under the control of native people. Because Pueblo people and the Navajo had taken Spanish invaders' horses and traded them north, they and the Sioux, Ute, Blackfoot, and other Plains Indians did very well. Hunting bison was much easier on horseback than it had been on foot. And [...]

Comanche history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-24T10:40:21+00:00August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

Comanche women (1800s) From Shoshone to Comanche Pueblo people captured Spanish horses in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 AD, and they sold some of those horses to the Shoshone, in what is now Wyoming. The Shoshone who had horses split off from the other Shoshone. They called themselves the Nermernuh, but their Ute neighbors called them the Comanche. [...]

Native Americans get horses and donkeys

By |2018-04-19T14:24:03+00:00June 20th, 2017|Native American, North America|

A Cheyenne man named Yellow Horse captures a herd of mules (Cheyenne drawing, about 1870). There had been no horses in North America since about 5600 BC, when buffalos ate their grass and then Native Americans (probably) hunted them (and camels) to extinction. But just after 1500 AD, horses returned when Spanish explorers brought [...]