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American science after colonization

By |2018-04-08T11:21:58+00:00September 28th, 2017|Americas, Native American, North America, Science|

European trade goods (thanks to Nebraska Game and Parks Division) North American people made rapid scientific advances in the course of the 1500s AD, inspired by contacts with traders and explorers from Europe. People learned how to tame horses and ride them, and they learned how to use guns. They also began to use a [...]

Thanksgiving becomes a national holiday

By |2018-10-29T14:36:41+00:00August 14th, 2017|North America, Religion|

Sarah Hale, who made Thanksgiving a national holiday Thanksgiving in the 1700s In the 1700s, most of the thirteen colonies had public Thanksgiving feasts at least once a year. Sometimes people held them more than once a year. The governor of each colony decided when to celebrate Thanksgiving. But in 1817, the governor of New York State decided to [...]

American clothing – 1600s AD

By |2017-08-10T16:55:02+00:00August 10th, 2017|Clothing, North America|

Algonquin people with wool blankets In the 1600s, most people still dressed the same as they had before, in deerskins. But in the south-west, Pueblo and Navajo people began to buy wool clothing from the Spanish settlers. Europeans produced a lot of wool to sell, so they wanted to sell it to Americans. The wool clothes were cheaper than deerskin, [...]

American clothing in the 1500s AD

By |2017-08-10T16:49:07+00:00August 10th, 2017|Clothing, North America|

A Cree deerskin jacket Kids in North America in the 1500s AD wore deerskin dresses or shirts and pants when it was cold, and they mostly went naked when it was warm. Often their moms cut down old worn-out grown-up clothes for their kids to wear, because clothes were so expensive. Grown-up women mostly wore long, loose [...]

American public buildings – Architecture

By |2018-04-19T11:29:03+00:00August 10th, 2017|Architecture, History, North America|

Iroquois longhouse In 1500 AD, the most important areas in North America for building public buildings were the Pueblo nation in the southwest, the Mississipian culture all along the Mississippi valley, the Cherokee nation in the southeast, and the Iroquois nation in the northeast. People in the Pueblo nation built mainly in adobe. San Miguel mission church (Santa Fe, 1600s) [...]

Navajo houses – American architecture

By |2017-08-10T15:25:24+00:00August 10th, 2017|Architecture, Native American, North America|

Can you see the sheepskins? How about the television? (1973) When people met the first Spanish explorers in the 1500s AD, most Navajo people were living in hogans. By trading with the Spanish settlers in the 1500s and 1600s AD, Navajo people were able to improve their hogans. First people got sheep from the Spanish settlers, and [...]

American architecture – houses

By |2017-08-10T15:09:35+00:00August 10th, 2017|Architecture, North America|

Iroquois longhouse Because North America is a big place, different parts of North America have different weather. In the Pacific Northwest, there were long rainy winters, and dry sunny summers, but it never got very cold. There were big forests with lots of tall trees. So people mainly lived in wooden houses with sloped roofs so [...]

History of the Jesuits – Catholicism

By |2018-04-24T09:23:19+00:00August 7th, 2017|Modern Europe, Religion|

History of the Jesuits: Ignatius of Loyola, who started the Jesuits Ignatius of Loyola In the early 1500s AD, the Protestants were the new thing in Europe. Protestants were getting more and more popular. A few students at the University of Paris in 1534, led by Ignatius of Loyola, wanted to make it cool to be a Catholic again. [...]

Europe’s economy in the Renaissance

By |2018-04-12T08:53:24+00:00August 4th, 2017|Economy, Medieval|

The Portuguese force Islamic traders to give them access to the Indian port of Goa (1500s AD, Theodore De Bry) In 1500 AD, Europe was still a marginal player in the world economy, which was centered on Central Asia. Europeans sold mostly raw materials - fur, silver, timber, and amber, to Central Asia via the Silk Road. And the Europeans bought [...]