tyranny

Home » tyranny

Who was Hippias, tyrant of Athens?

By |2018-04-23T07:11:04-07:00July 7th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Harmodius and Aristogeiton attacking Hippias and Hipparchus Hippias and Hipparchus When the tyrant Pisistratus died in 528 BC, his two sons, Hippias and Hipparchus, took over ruling Athens as tyrants. Hippias seems to have taken care of most of the politics, while Hipparchus took care of religious matters and the gods. (We hear about [...]

Tyrant Game – Ancient Greece activity

By |2018-04-23T07:02:27-07:00July 7th, 2017|Government, Greeks|

Harmodius and Aristogeiton To understand more about tyranny, play a game with a group of kids (about 25 is perfect) where you decide whether to have a tyrant, and who should be the tyrant. Most of the kids (all but five) will be ordinary people - men and women, mostly farmers. About half [...]

Corinth, Greece in the Classical period – a rich city-state in ancient Greece

By |2018-01-10T10:37:56-07:00July 6th, 2017|Government, Greeks, History|

Corinth, Greece: Corinthian aryballos (perfume jar) in the shape of an owl (now in the Louvre, Paris) Corinth, Greece: A Greek city-state sells perfume and pottery In the 800s and 700s BC, Corinth was very wealthy from trade and from selling their perfume in little fancy pottery jars. Corinthian traders also  sold the [...]

Athens under the Tyrants – Ancient Greece

By |2017-07-06T22:14:18-07:00July 6th, 2017|Government, Greeks, History|

Obol minted under Pisistratus with the head of Medusa At first people were happy with Solon's changes. They had their farms back, and they didn't owe any money, and they weren't being killed for little things. They could (if they were free men) be judges and vote in the Assembly. But the people [...]