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Ghost Dance – Native American religion

By | 2017-08-14T14:33:35+00:00 August 14th, 2017|History|

Wovoka, a Paiute man By the late 1800s AD, the United States and Canadian armies forced most of the people who had hunted bison on the Great Plains to move to reservations. The reservations were on terrible land. They were deserts with no water. And now that the bison had all been killed, people had no way to [...]

Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee – Sioux history

By | 2017-08-14T09:33:27+00:00 August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Red Elk Woman, a member of the Sioux In the 1500s and 1600s AD, Sioux people were still living around the Great Lakes (modern Minnesota). That's where they were in 1667 when they first met French fur traders. But by the 1700s the Sioux (you pronounce it SOO), along with the Cheyenne and the Arapaho, had left [...]

Mandan and Sacagawea – American history

By | 2017-08-13T17:54:38+00:00 August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Mandan village in 1832 Around 1500 AD, Mandan women began to build round houses, or lodges, instead of rectangular ones. They also started using bison skin tipis when they were travelling or hunting. By the 1600s, the Mandan were probably already catching European diseases like measles and smallpox from their Sioux and Mississippian neighbors, even though they hadn't met any Europeans yet. [...]

Lewis and Clark – American history

By | 2017-08-13T17:28:54+00:00 August 13th, 2017|History, North America|

Lewis and Clark In 1804 AD, the Sioux people received a visit from official representatives of the newly formed United States government. The visitors' names were Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Both of them had already killed many Native Americans. Mostly they had killed Shawnee. They were fighting to take Shawnee land in the Appalachians. The Sioux didn't [...]

The Crow get horses – American history

By | 2017-08-13T09:29:52+00:00 August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Crow men In the 1600s AD, Crow people were still living in the Dakotas. But they caught smallpox and measles from their neighbors, the Mandan, and many Crow people died. So even though they had not yet met any Europeans, Crow people's lives were still very much changed by European settlers. Crow people met Europeans for the first time in [...]

Cree and smallpox – American history

By | 2017-08-12T22:03:48+00:00 August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Cree man In the 1500s AD, people who called themselves the Eenou lived in the northern part of North America, around what is now the border between the United States and Canada. Modern historians call them the Cree. They mostly lived in the forests of what is now Minnesota and Wisconsin. Their language was [...]

Comanche history – Native Americans

By | 2017-08-12T21:53:36+00:00 August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

Comanche women (1800s) Pueblo people captured Spanish horses in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 AD, and they sold some of those horses to the Shoshone, in what is now Wyoming. The Shoshone who had horses split off from the other Shoshone. They called themselves the Nermernuh, but their Ute neighbors called them the Comanche. The Comanche really took [...]

Blackfoot get horses – American history

By | 2017-08-12T14:46:20+00:00 August 12th, 2017|History, Native American|

Blackfoot man with horse Throughout the 1500s and 1600s AD, the Blackfoot continued to live in the same way they had lived before 1500. But the lives of Blackfoot people changed a lot in about 1730 AD, when they got horses from other North American tribes. Once they had horses, they could hunt bison and get their food more easily [...]

American government after the Civil War

By | 2017-08-12T07:44:44+00:00 August 12th, 2017|Government, North America|

J. Rainey, first black congressman After the Civil War, in 1865, the United States changed its Constitution to make slavery illegal. For a few years, black people were able to vote. Black men served in Congress. But soon northern people lost interest in helping the black people. Racist white people forced the black people to stop voting [...]

Early Native American languages

By | 2017-08-10T10:13:55+00:00 August 10th, 2017|Literature, Native American|

Inuit carving of a fish The languages Native American people spoke (and still speak) in North America fall into several groups. The Cherokee and the Iroquois, on the East Coast, spoke Iroquoian languages. In the midwest, the Sioux, the Crow, and the Mandan spoke related languages. In the Pacific Northwest, the Chinook and the Nez Perce shared a language group. In the Southwest, the Shoshone, [...]