Shawnee

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Shawnee and Tecumseh – American history

By |2018-04-08T21:33:38+00:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Shawnee cooking pot (ca. 1500 AD) The Shawnee people probably first suffered from contact with European explorers and traders shortly after 1500 AD. That's when they caught measles from their Iroquois and Mississippian neighbors. Many Shawnee died. There were fewer Shawnee people than there had been before. Shawnee people kept on living in villages, but the villages seem to have [...]

Mississippians and American history

By |2018-11-20T10:05:20+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Excavation of a house at Joara The Little Ice Age The people who lived in the lower Mississippi valley (modern Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama) were not doing so well around 1500 AD. The Little Ice Age of the 1400s, or some other crisis, had weakened their economic and political system. But they were farming corn and beans and [...]

Louisiana Purchase – American history

By |2018-05-04T11:11:14+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American, North America|

Louisiana Purchase: What Europeans were claiming Before the Louisiana purchase In 1800 AD, Native Americans still controlled most of North America. But Spain, France, Britain and the United States were busy fighting over who got to conquer it. Native Americans and Spain Spain was trying to conquer the land along the West Coast and the Southwest, and Florida. But most of that [...]

Lewis and Clark – American history

By |2017-08-13T17:28:54+00:00August 13th, 2017|History, North America|

Lewis and Clark In 1804 AD, the Sioux people received a visit from official representatives of the newly formed United States government. The visitors' names were Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Both of them had already killed many Native Americans. Mostly they had killed Shawnee. They were fighting to take Shawnee land in the Appalachians. The Sioux didn't [...]

Iroquois history: the Revolutionary War

By |2018-04-24T10:20:26+00:00August 13th, 2017|History|

Iroquois history: Trade beads made in Venice in the 1600s and traded in North America Iroquois trade for beads and knives When the first European traders came to the north Atlantic coast, about 1600 AD, the Iroquois were very interested in trading with them. People sold the Dutch traders lots and lots of beaver furs to make hats with, and [...]

Later Cherokee towns – Native Americans

By |2017-08-10T14:19:22+00:00August 10th, 2017|Architecture, Native American|

A Cherokee house in the 1800s In the late 1600s AD, Cherokee people were still building their towns about the way they had built them before the Europeans arrived. We have a good description from an English trader called James Needham. He visited the Cherokee town of Chota in 1673. (I have modernized the language) "The [...]

Green corn ceremony – Native American religion

By |2018-04-12T08:53:19+00:00August 10th, 2017|Food, Native American, Religion|

Corn, beans, and squash growing together Like other people around the world, when people in North America started to get more of their food from farming, starting about 1 AD, they also began to hold harvest festivals every year to celebrate a successful harvest with plenty of food to eat for the next year. People thanked the [...]

Early Shawnee history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:39+00:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Serpent Mound (Ohio, about 500 BC?) Shawnee people were related to the Algonquin and the Cree, and spoke a related Athabascan language, but they lived a little further south, in the mid-west (modern Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Kentucky). Indeed, the word "Shawnee" may mean "south people". The Shawnee lived more like their neighbors than like [...]

Blackfoot history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:33+00:00August 8th, 2017|History, Native American|

Montana landscape with a moose calf wading People we call Athabascans or Dene lived in Blackfoot territory (modern Montana and Canada) in the Paleo-Indian period, by around 10,000 BC. They lived by hunting and gathering. They hunted mammoth, and gathered eggs and wild plants. By 6000 BC, in the Archaic period, the climate warmed up, so the big animals like mammoth became [...]

Where are the Appalachian mountains?

By |2019-01-29T05:37:18+00:00June 25th, 2017|Geology, North America|

The Appalachian Mountains When did the Appalachian Mountains form? About 300 million years ago, near the end of the Carboniferous period, when the first reptiles were evolving, the tectonic plates began to form the supercontinent of Pangaea. More about plate tectonics The Carboniferous period All our geology articles How high were the Appalachians [...]