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Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee – Sioux history

By |2018-05-21T17:09:53-07:00August 14th, 2017|History, Native American|

Sioux history - Red Elk Woman, a member of the Sioux When did the Sioux first meet Europeans? In the 1500s and 1600s AD, Sioux people were still living around the Great Lakes (modern Minnesota). That's where they were in 1667 when they first met French fur traders. (Read about the early Sioux) When did the [...]

Mandan and Sacagawea – American history

By |2017-08-13T17:54:38-07:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

A Mandan village in 1832 Around 1500 AD, Mandan women began to build round houses, or lodges, instead of rectangular ones. They also started using bison skin tipis when they were travelling or hunting. By the 1600s, the Mandan were probably already catching European diseases like measles and smallpox from their Sioux and Mississippian neighbors, even though they hadn't met any Europeans yet. [...]

The Crow get horses – American history

By |2019-04-29T16:30:04-07:00August 13th, 2017|History, Native American|

Crow men: later Crow history Crow people get smallpox and measles In the 1600s AD, Crow people were still living in the Dakotas. But they caught smallpox and measles from their neighbors, the Mandan, and many Crow people died. What was smallpox? How do you get measles? Early Crow history All our American history articles So even though they had [...]

Early Mandan history – Native Americans

By |2018-04-07T17:05:36-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, Native American|

Shawnee state forest in Ohio - where the Mandan were living in 500 AD The Mandan were relatives of the Sioux people. Around 500 AD, they probably lived in the Midwest of North America, in what is now Ohio. Like their Sioux relatives, and like the Mississippians to their south, the Crow to their west and the Shawnee to their east, the Mandan [...]

Crow history – Native Americans

By |2019-04-29T11:43:07-07:00August 9th, 2017|History, North America|

Crow history and homeland: Lake Itasca, at the source of the Mississippi River What do Crow people call themselves? The Crow call themselves the Apsáalooke, the Bird's Children; Crow is an English translation of Apsáalooke. Native American languages All our Native American articles Where did early Crow live? Around 500 AD the Crow people seem [...]