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Science in Islamic Africa – medieval African science

By |2018-10-04T06:52:15+00:00October 3rd, 2017|Africa, Science|

Medieval African science: The walls of Timbuktu, in Mali, West Africa Medieval African science In the 700s AD, the Islamic Empire conquered North Africa and began to trade a lot with East Africa. Islamic government did not allow women to work in science or medicine. But there were a lot of men in North Africa and East Africa, and in the area [...]

What’s the sun made of? – Astronomy – Science

By |2018-04-24T14:46:25+00:00August 19th, 2017|Physics|

The sun from space The Sun is a star, just like billions of other stars in the universe. Our Sun probably formed a little more than four and a half billion years ago, just a little bit before the planets formed around it. It's not one of the older stars in the Universe. Probably some of [...]

What are stars made of? Astronomy, physics

By |2018-05-31T11:49:32+00:00August 19th, 2017|Physics|

What are stars made of? This is just one of the stars: the sun from space The first stars The earliest stars probably formed only a few hundred thousand years after the Big Bang that started the universe - maybe about 13.5 billion years ago. Stars are the oldest big objects in the Universe. (More [...]

Main sequence stars – Astronomy

By |2018-05-31T11:49:32+00:00August 18th, 2017|Physics|

Main sequence stars: A starry sky with the Milky Way galaxy (thanks to Bernd Nies) What is a main sequence star? Nine out of ten stars that you see in the sky are main-sequence stars, and our sun is one of them. (More about the sun) Most main-sequence stars probably started out as brown dwarfs, and then succeeded [...]

Galaxies – Astronomy – Space science

By |2018-05-31T11:49:27+00:00August 18th, 2017|Physics|

The galaxy M 100, seen through the Hubble telescope A galaxy is a group of millions of stars that are relatively near each other. Most stars seem to be in one or another galaxy. Earth's own star, the Sun, is in the Milky Way galaxy. Small galaxies have about ten million stars, while big galaxies sometimes have [...]

Medieval Islamic science

By |2018-04-24T08:21:20+00:00July 27th, 2017|Islam, Science|

Al Tusi's diagram of linear motion from circular motion In the Early Middle Ages, before the formation of the Islamic Empire, Buddhists ran the world's biggest universities. One was in India, at Nalanda. Another was in what is now Pakistan, at Taxila. In Egypt, the University of Alexandria was still an important center of learning, too. Most serious scholars went to [...]

Medieval Islamic astronomy

By |2018-04-23T10:04:24+00:00July 27th, 2017|History, Islam, Science|

Islamic astronomers taking observations West Asian astronomers had been world leaders in astronomy for thousands of years before the Islamic conquests in the 600s AD. In the last centuries BC, West Asian astronomers had already figured out that the earth was a ball, and that the earth went around the sun, and how big the earth was, and that the moon went [...]

al Tusi – Discoveries of Islamic astronomy

By |2017-07-27T08:30:46+00:00July 27th, 2017|Islam, Science|

Al Tusi in his observatory (ca. 1259 AD) Nasir al Tusi was born in Iran in 1201 AD, as the Seljuk Empire was falling apart. The Seljuks were Turkic people. But al Tusi, like most of the people living near him, was of Iranian descent. He spoke Persian at home. He was from a Shiite, Sufi family. Al Tusi's father died when he [...]