Xerxes

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From Xerxes to Alexander – the later Persian Empire

By |2018-04-23T07:27:11+00:00September 14th, 2017|History, West Asia|

The Persian shah, Xerxes, from the 400s BC. Death of Xerxes and revolt King Xerxes was killed in 465 BC. His assassin may have been his son Ardashir I (Artaxerxes in Greek), who succeeded him. Ardashir was a weak king, and a lot of the conquered countries revolted while Ardashir was king. By this time, [...]

Who were the Persians? Persian Empire – Iran – history

By |2018-10-30T07:40:22+00:00September 14th, 2017|History, West Asia, Where|

The Persians came from the Central Asian steppe The Persians and the Medes Around 1200 BC, some Indo-European people from Central Asia moved south into West Asia. These people were the Persians and the Medes. Who were the Indo-Europeans? More Central Asia articles More West Asia (Middle East) articles Nomads and cattle-herders in Central Asia The Persians [...]

What is a pontoon bridge? History of science

By |2017-09-08T09:08:30+00:00September 8th, 2017|Science, West Asia|

A pontoon bridge from the Column of Marcus Aurelius, in Rome A pontoon bridge is a temporary bridge that you make by lining up a lot of boats crossways across the river, and then putting wooden planks over the boats to make a bridge. You can see one in the picture. It's a fast way [...]

Battle of Salamis – Second Persian War

By |2018-04-23T08:06:26+00:00July 18th, 2017|Greeks, War|

Phoenician ship In 480 BC, the Persian king Xerxes was attacking Greece. Things looked very bad for the Greeks, when the Greek navy, under the command of the Athenian general Themistocles, wrecked the Persian fleet at Salamis and kept the Persians from taking over Greece. Both the Persians and the Greeks used triremes to fight this naval battle. The Persians had a [...]

What is hubris? Hubris definition in easy words

By |2018-04-18T17:27:47+00:00July 13th, 2017|Greeks, Religion|

Hubris definition: Aegisthus murdering Agamemnon Definition of hubris Hubris (HOO-briss) is a Greek word which we translate into English as "pride" or "arrogance." (You can also spell it hybris). Its original meaning in Greek was to hit something. But hubris means thinking you are better than you really are, as in the expression "Pride [...]

Defeat at Thermopylae – Second Persian War

By |2018-04-23T08:07:48+00:00July 9th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Thermopylae The Spartans fought the Persians at the mountain pass of Thermopylae for three days, while the other Greek soldiers got safely away to the south. At the end of three days, every one of the three hundred Spartan soldiers was dead, along with the Spartan king, Leonidas. But meanwhile the Athenians and other [...]

Thermopylae – Xerxes and the Second Persian War

By |2018-04-23T08:07:20+00:00July 9th, 2017|Greeks, History, West Asia|

Map of Greece showing where Thermopylae is The Greeks heard that Xerxes and the Persians were coming. They disagreed about what to do. The Spartans and Corinthians wanted to abandon northern Greece and only defend southern Greece (where they were). But the Athenians insisted that they should try to defend northern Greece at the [...]

Second Persian War – ancient Greece

By |2017-07-09T02:12:19+00:00July 9th, 2017|Greeks, History, West Asia|

Gold coin of Xerxes (or another Persian king) After the Athenians beat the Persians in the First Persian War, at the battle of Marathon, the Persians left the Greeks alone for ten years. The Persians were busy fighting a revolt in Egypt, and their king Darius had died. But as soon as Darius' son [...]

Battle of Plataea – Second Persian War

By |2018-04-23T07:20:43+00:00July 9th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Battle of Plataea: Iranian archers from the Persian Empire Battle of Plataea Now that the Greeks had won a major naval victory over the Persians at Salamis, they were braver. Now they were all eager to fight the Persian army on land too. So in the spring of 479 BC, when Xerxes sent [...]

Classical Greek history

By |2018-04-23T06:34:12+00:00July 7th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Classical Greece: the Pnyx, where the Athenian Assembly met Democracy in Athens In 510 BC a man named Cleisthenes (KLICE-then-eez), who was an aristocrat (a rich, powerful man) in Athens, invented another new type of government, the democracy. Cleisthenes, like other aristocrats, wanted to get more power. But tyrants had gotten unpopular in [...]