Naram-Sin

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Amorites – Mesopotamia – West Asian history

By |2018-04-25T23:48:13+00:00September 13th, 2017|History, West Asia|

History of the Amorites: an Amorite jug, about 2200 BC Where did the Amorites live? About 2400 BC, the Amorites were living in what is now southern Turkey and Syria. Amorites means "westerners" in Sumerian, and that makes sense because the Amorites lived to the west of Sumer. They spoke a Semitic language, and lived partly [...]

Akkadians – Mesopotamia – West Asian history

By |2018-04-25T23:43:09+00:00September 13th, 2017|History, West Asia|

Head of Akkadian king (maybe Sargon) Sargon of Akkad gradually conquered the area between the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers around 2300 BC. The Akkadians spoke a Semitic language, like the Amorites. Sargon, according to Sumerian literature, was born to an Akkadian high priestess and a poor father, maybe a gardener. His mother abandoned him by putting him in a [...]

West Asian government – Mesopotamia and Iran

By |2018-04-25T23:41:44+00:00September 13th, 2017|Government, West Asia|

West Asian government: the stele of Naram-Sin shows the king leading his troops to victory. Empires and city-states Since the time of the Akkadians, about 2300 BC, West Asian government has cycled back and forth between unity and disunity. Sometimes there are big empires ruled by a "king of kings". Other times there are smaller kingdoms [...]

Akkadian art – Bronze Age Mesopotamia

By |2018-04-19T12:28:54+00:00September 11th, 2017|Art, West Asia|

Head of Akkadian king (maybe Sargon) When the Akkadians, from northern Iraq, conquered southern Iraq about 2400 BC, they unified all of Iraq - Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers - into one empire for the first time. In some ways, Akkadian art was the same as the Sumerian art that went before it. [...]