Byzantine

/Tag: Byzantine

Justinian – Byzantine Reconquest – A later Roman emperor

By |2018-11-13T10:10:43-07:00August 2nd, 2017|History, Medieval|

Justinian - Byzantine mosaic from Ravenna, Italy (500s AD) Justinian and Theodora The Roman Emperor Justinian took power when his uncle, Justin, died in 527 AD. Before becoming emperor, Justinian married Theodora. That upset a lot of people because she was an actress. Many Roman people thought all actresses were bad women. But in fact Theodora [...]

Leo to Empress Irene – Byzantine History

By |2017-08-02T09:17:48-07:00August 2nd, 2017|History, Medieval|

Leo the Isaurian (ca. 720 AD, Louvre museum, Paris) When Justinian's assassin Philippicus turned out to be a worthless party animal, other Roman officials killed him. In 713 AD the people of Constantinople chose a court official named Anastasius II to be the next emperor. Anastasius (ann-ah-STAYS-yus) was a practical guy, with good ideas - but [...]

Comneni Dynasty – Byzantine history

By |2019-04-21T11:45:07-07:00August 1st, 2017|History, Medieval|

Alexios I Comneni, the Byzantine emperor (1081 AD) The Battle of Manzikert The Battle of Manzikert in 1071 was the end of Basil's Armenian Dynasty. The Byzantines had lost Armenia to Alp Arslan and the Seljuk Turks, and Alp Arslan took the Roman Emperor prisoner. Battle of Manzikert Who was Alp Arslan? All our medieval Europe articles [...]

Basil, Zoe, and the Armenian Dynasty

By |2019-02-11T05:19:54-07:00August 1st, 2017|History, Medieval|

Basil starts the Armenian Dynasty In 867 AD, Basil killed Bardas and took over as Roman Emperor. That started the Armenian Dynasty. People call it that because of Basil's Armenian ancestors. (Sometimes people call it the Macedonian Dynasty because Basil was born in Macedon.) More about Bardas High Middle Ages All our medieval Europe articles Basil's foreign policy Basil continued [...]

Anastasius to Justin – Byzantine history

By |2019-01-26T09:28:33-07:00August 1st, 2017|History, Medieval|

The Byzantine empress Ariadne, who married Anastasius. Now in the Louvre museum in Paris Anastasius becomes Roman Emperor When the Roman Emperor Zeno died in 491 AD, his widow Ariadne chose one of Zeno's advisors, Anastasius, to become the new emperor (and she married him too). Back to Zeno All our Roman Empire articles Early Medieval articles Zeno left the [...]

Medieval Russian art

By |2018-04-10T22:49:24-07:00August 1st, 2017|Art, Medieval|

Russian Icon of Saint Nicolas, 13th - early 14th century, tempera on wood. Our knowledge of Russian art begins with the Scythians and other Central Asian art. But what most people think of as Russian art begins when the Russians convert to Christianity around 400 AD. At this time Russian artists begin painting in a more Roman style (that is, the [...]

Byzantine pottery – Middle Ages

By |2017-08-01T08:08:24-07:00August 1st, 2017|Art, Medieval|

(Metropolitan Museum, New York) After the fall of the western part of the Roman Empire, the remaining part of the Roman empire in West Asia and Egypt kept on using Roman red pottery. But by around 700 AD, after Heraclius, Byzantine potters began to make tin-glazed pottery, just like in the neighboring Umayyad empire. This glazed pottery looked a lot like [...]

Byzantine art history: Iconoclasm

By |2018-04-10T22:49:22-07:00July 31st, 2017|Art, Medieval|

Artemis, carved in ivory in Constantinople (now in the Cluny museum, Paris) The art of Rome continued in an unbroken tradition from the days of the Republic down to the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Empire in 1453 AD, for more than a thousand years after the fall of the western part of the Roman Empire in the early 400s AD. But we [...]

Byzantine Greece – medieval history

By |2019-07-17T17:50:24-07:00July 7th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Byzantine Greece Byzantine Greece: Interior of Hagia Sophia After the collapse of the western part of the Roman Empire around 400 AD, the Romans continued to rule Greece , but now from their new capital at Constantinople. Roman Greece Fall of Rome Early Middle Ages All our ancient Greece articles The Romans weren't [...]