Louis IX

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Seventh Crusade – Louis IX and Baybars

By |2017-08-03T15:02:32+00:00August 3rd, 2017|History, Medieval|

Louis IX (Saint Louis) The Seventh Crusade was not started by any Pope, but by King Louis IX of France, who became known later as Saint Louis because of his great devotion to the Christian God. The year after the Mamluks captured Jerusalem from the Europeans in 1244 AD, Louis announced his Crusade (in 1245). His mother, Blanche of Castile, thought [...]

Eighth Crusade – Medieval Europe

By |2017-08-03T11:08:24+00:00August 3rd, 2017|History, Medieval|

Louis IX sailing to Tunis with the Eighth Crusade (1270 AD) When Blanche of Castile died, her son Louis IX of France had to spend some time at home in France getting things organized. But then Louis' youngest brother Charles encouraged him to try another Crusade. The Seventh Crusade, which Louis led, had ended in failure in 1254 AD, [...]

Philip Augustus and Blanche of Castile

By |2018-09-21T08:49:12+00:00August 3rd, 2017|History, Medieval|

Medieval France: The castle at Dourdan, built by Philip Augustus Philip Augustus, King of France Louis VII's son, Philip Auguste, was much more ambitious and smarter than his father. Philip came to the throne in 1180 AD, when he was only fourteen years old. Go back to Louis VII Articles about medieval Europe Philip [...]

Sainte Chapelle – Paris – Conciergerie

By |2017-07-31T10:08:19+00:00July 31st, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|

Sainte Chapelle, in Paris The Sainte Chapelle was (and is) a beautiful little church or chapel in France, on the island in the middle of the city of Paris. King Louis IX, also known as Saint Louis, and his mother, Queen Blanche of Castile, built it between 1241 and 1248 AD (before Louis left on the Seventh Crusade). King [...]

Sainte Chapelle project – Middle Ages

By |2017-07-30T21:32:19+00:00July 30th, 2017|Art, Medieval|

Can you match each of these stained-glass windows from the Sainte Chapelle to the Bible story it illustrates? Noah's Ark Moses and the Burning Bush Marking the doors for Passover Parting the Red Sea God gives Moses the Ten Commandments Worshipping the Golden Calf Golden Menorah of the Ark of the Covenant Hanging of the [...]

Conciergerie – Paris, France

By |2017-07-30T18:14:23+00:00July 30th, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|

Conciergerie: the king's castle in Paris (parts of it from the 1300 AD) The Conciergerie was the castle where the kings and queens of France lived when they were in Paris. Originally this was the Roman fort, where the Roman commander of Paris lived. The Roman general Julian was acclaimed emperor here in 361 AD. This Roman fort lasted for more [...]

Chartres cathedral transepts

By |2018-04-24T08:01:24+00:00July 30th, 2017|Architecture, Medieval|

Chartres cathedral crossing and transept When the builders were done with the nave, they built the great big columns of the crossing. Like the columns of the nave, the crossing columns went almost uninterrupted all the way up, to draw your eyes upward. They were made to look like a lot of little columns, [...]

Hafsid Dynasty – Medieval Islam

By |2017-10-29T17:42:34+00:00July 24th, 2017|Africa, History, Islam|

Hafsid gold coin In the early 1200s AD, the Almohad empire fell apart into Marinid, Christian, and Hafsid kingdoms. The middle of North Africa broke away from the Almohad dynasty in 1229 AD. Modern Tunisia, western Libya, and eastern Algeria came under the leadership of Abu Zakariya. People called his descendants the Hafsids, because they belonged to the powerful Banu Hafs [...]

Toregene and Kublai Khan – Mongol Empire History

By |2017-05-31T15:37:25+00:00May 31st, 2017|Central Asia, History|

Coin of Toregene Toregene ruled the Mongol Empire for five years. By then she was not in good health - she was about 55 years old. She passed on her power to her son Guyuk in 1246 AD and went into retirement, where she died less than two years later. Mongke Khan [...]