Parthenon

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Peloponnesian War – Athens and Sparta

By |2018-04-23T08:03:17+00:00July 9th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Parthenon, Athens The Athenian historian Thucydides, who lived through the Peloponnesian War and wrote the history of it, began by asking, why did the war start? He answered that basically the war started because Athens was too greedy, and tried to take over all of Greece. They had taken everybody's money, and used [...]

Byzantine Greek history – Greece in the Middle Ages

By |2018-04-23T07:08:14+00:00July 7th, 2017|Greeks, History|

Byzantine Greece Byzantine Greece: Interior of Hagia Sophia After the collapse of the western part of the Roman Empire around 400 AD, the Romans continued to rule Greece , but now from their new capital at Constantinople. The Romans weren't as strong as they had been before, so there were a lot of [...]

Classical Greek sculpture – ancient Greece

By |2018-04-22T11:35:38+00:00July 5th, 2017|Art, Greeks|

Classical Greek sculpture: Discobolos (the Discus Thrower) (This is a Roman copy; the Greek one didn't last) The Severe style didn't last very long, and by about 460 BC Greek sculptors moved on to the Classical style. Greek sculptors began to experiment with honoring the gods by showing the beauty and grace of [...]

Parthenon frieze – Greek architecture

By |2018-04-22T10:26:04+00:00July 1st, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Parthenon frieze - seated goddesses On the Parthenon's frieze, Pheidias carved a long procession of Athenians, with girls in the front, bringing a new dress for the goddess Athena to her temple. A scene from the Parthenon frieze: bringing the new dress for the goddess Most of the carving was done [...]

Parthenon metopes – Greek architecture

By |2018-04-22T10:26:03+00:00July 1st, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Metope from the Parthenon On the metopes, just under the roof, Phidias carved the battle between Lapiths (men) and centaurs (the Centauromachy), Greeks against Amazons (Amazonomachy), the gods against the giants (the Gigantomachy) and the sack of Troy. Metope from the Parthenon: Lapith and Centaur All these stories show the greatness [...]

Parthenon pediment – Ancient Greece

By |2018-04-22T10:26:03+00:00July 1st, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Parthenon pediment On the front of the Parthenon, in the triangular pediment, Pheidias carved the contest between Athena and Poseidon to be the main god of the city of Athens, and on the back pediment he put the birth of Athena out of the head of her father Zeus. Neither of these pediments [...]

Parthenon columns – optical illusions

By |2018-04-22T10:26:03+00:00July 1st, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Parthenon, Athens So the architects of the Parthenon set out to make it the best temple ever. Most Greek temples had six columns across the front – the Parthenon has eight. Most temples had either a frieze (a continuous band of sculpture) or metopes (individual panels) – the Parthenon has both. There's a [...]

Parthenon – Ancient Greece

By |2018-04-22T10:26:03+00:00July 1st, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Parthenon, Athens The Parthenon was a temple to Athena built on top of the highest hill in Athens, the Acropolis (Acropolis means High City). In the Late Bronze Age, about 1300 BC, the Acropolis had been where the kings of Athens lived (likeTheseus in the myth), and where everybody went to defend themselves [...]

What are triglyphs and metopes?

By |2018-04-22T10:25:19+00:00July 1st, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Greek temple at Agrigento, Sicily Most Greek temples have a pattern under the pediment known as triglyphs and metopes. The triglyphs alternate with the metopes across the front of the temple. Triglyphs (TRY-gliffs) have three parts, and then in between the triglyphs are the metopes (MET-oh-peas). Perseus killing Medusa (in the middle) [...]

Classical Greek Architecture

By |2018-04-22T11:36:39+00:00June 30th, 2017|Architecture, Greeks|

Parthenon, Athens There is no really sharp change in the style of architecture between the Archaic and the Classical periods. One blends gradually into the other. For no particular reason, we actually have more archaic temples that survive than we do classical temples. The most famous surviving classical temple is the Parthenon in [...]