Roman Games - Ancient Rome
Quatr.us answers questions

Roman Games

Dice
Roman dice

October 2016 - People mean a lot of different things when they say Roman games. Sometimes they mean the sitting-down games people played with each other, like dice and checkers. Sometimes they mean the athletic games people played, like ball games.

Circus
Roman circus

Other times when people say Roman games they mean games that people went to watch, like a football game today. The Romans had two main kinds of spectator sports - gladiatorial games and circus games.

Learn by doing: play a game of checkers
More about Roman gladiators
More about Roman chariot racing

Bibliography and further reading about Roman games:

Spend the Day in Ancient Rome: Projects and Activities that Bring the Past to Life, Ages 8-12 by Linda Honan (1998). But the project to make knucklebones seems silly. Ask your butcher for real bones, use pebbles, or buy jacks. Easy reading.

Ancient Rome (Eyewitness Books), by Simon James (2004).

Kids Around the World Play!: The Best Fun and Games from Many Lands, by Arlette N. Braman (2002). Easy reading. There are lots of ancient games in here too, even though the title doesn't say so.

Children and Childhood in Roman Italy, by Beryl Rawson (2003).

More about Ancient Rome
Quatr.us home


Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

Help support Quatr.us!

Quatr.us (formerly "History for Kids") is entirely supported by your generous donations and by our sponsors. Most donors give about $10. Can you give $10 today to keep this site running? Or give $50 to sponsor a page?

Quatr.us celebrates the victory of the Sioux people and their allies at Standing Rock. Here's more about the history of the Sioux and some of their neighbors: the Mandan, the Crow, the Cree, the Shoshone, and the Paiute. And about global warming.