Arch of Titus - triumphal arch in Rome
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Arch of Titus

Arch of Titus interior
Interior of the Arch of Titus

The inside of the arch has relief (raised) carvings showing the victory parade when Titus got back to Rome.

Here's a closeup of the carvings:

You can see the Roman soldiers carrying a huge menorah (candlestick) which they had taken from the Jews. They are about to go under a triumphal arch.


On the other side, the Emperor Titus (whose head is missing now) rides in a chariot drawn by four horses.

The holes were made by people in the Middle Ages digging out the lead clamps which once held the travertine blocks together. They wanted to melt down the lead to make new things.

Learn by doing: build an arch
Arch of Septimius Severus
Arch of Constantine

Bibliography and further reading about the Arch of Titus:

The Colosseum & the Roman Forum, by Martyn Whittock (2002). Easy reading.

The Roman Forum, by Michael Grant (1970). Out of date, but Michael Grant is an entertaining writer with a simple style which teenagers may appreciate.

Ancient Roman Art, by Susie Hodge (1998). Easy reading.

Roman Art: Romulus to Constantine, by Nancy and Andrew Ramage (4th Edition 2004). The standard textbook.

More about Roman Art
Ancient Rome
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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Now that the weather's nice, try some of these outdoor activities! How about bicycle polo, or archery for a Medieval Islam day? Or kite flying or making a compass for a day in Medieval China? How about making a shaduf for a day in Ancient Egypt? Holding an Ancient Greek Olympic Games or a medieval European tournament? Building a Native American wickiup?