Baths of Caracalla - Ancient Rome - Roman public baths
Quatr.us answers questions

Baths of Caracalla

Map
Baths of Caracalla
Baths of Caracalla

Roman emperors often built huge public bath buildings for the people of Rome to enjoy. The largest one, and one that also happens to be very well preserved so we can still see it today, was the one built by the Emperor Caracalla, about 200 AD. When you first came in, you went into a big courtyard with changing rooms around it. This was for exercising - stretching, jogging, or aerobics.

There were two of these exercise courtyards, one on each end of the bath building. They had black and white mosaic pavements with patterns. Above them, there was a wooden balcony that went all the way around, so you could watch the people who were exercising. You can still see the holes in the brickwork where the balcony was attached.

More about the Baths of Caracalla

Roman Baths
Aqueducts
Sewage
Roman Architecture
Ancient Rome
Quatr.us home


Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

Help support Quatr.us!

Quatr.us (formerly "History for Kids") is entirely supported by your generous donations and by our sponsors. Most donors give about $10. Can you give $10 today to keep this site running? Or give $50 to sponsor a page?

Quatr.us supports Black Lives Matter - here are some suggestions for how you can too! Read more about the history of Africans and African-Americans with our articles on the economy of medieval Africa, African scientific discoveries, black Americans and the Constitution, African-American slavery, the cotton gin, and the civil rights movement.