Neptune - Planets
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Neptune

Neptune from space
Neptune from space

Neptune is the farthest planet from our Sun. Neptune is the only planet that is so far away that you can't see it without a telescope. Neptune (NEPP-toon) is an icy planet, about the same size as Uranus. Neptune's probably a lot like Uranus in other ways, too. Neptune has a rocky core about the size of the Earth, made of rock and ice. Around that, there's a thick atmosphere made out of hydrogen, helium and methane. Neptune looks blue partly because the methane in the atmosphere absorbs red light and reflects blue light - it's not oceans. Neptune also has rings around it, and at least thirteen moons.

Because Neptune's so far from the Sun, it's very cold there - about -400 degrees Celsius. Neptune has so far to go that it takes Neptune almost 165 of our years to go around the Sun.

Bibliography and further reading about planets:

Planets
Stars
Space
Physics
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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