Math Games - numbers, geometry, algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and more answers questions

Math Games

Choose difficulty
Choose Math function


Player scoring:
0 sec
- - - - - - Highscores - - - - - -


Before you begin, be sure to select the difficulty setting and math function that you want. These options are at the top of the page and can only be changed after the game has stopped. The difficulty option shows the range of numbers that the problem can be constructed from, (0-10 means the problem can be from 0+0 to 10+10.

To start a session, click on the 'New Player' button. Enter your name, then click on the 'Start game' button to begin answering the problems. To answer a problem, just click on the button under the answer you want.

The game will track how many answers you get right and wrong and how long it takes you to get the correct answer (in seconds). You can stop the game at any time by clicking on the 'Stop game' button. This will put your current score in the Highscores area at the bottom.

To switch players, click on the 'New Player' button. As you switch players, the previous player's score will be added to the Highscores area.

Copyright © 2003 Patrick Lewis. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

Thanks to The JavaScript Source

Bibliography and further reading about circles:

More about Geometry
More about Math home

Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

Help support! (formerly "History for Kids") is entirely supported by your generous donations and by our sponsors. Most donors give about $10. Can you give $10 today to keep this site running? Or give $50 to sponsor a page?

For the US election, check out' page on the Constitution. From the Revolution on, people have fought for the right to vote. In the 1800s, Andrew Jackson got poor white men the vote; the Civil War and Lincoln brought the vote to African-American men. In the 1900s, women got the vote, and Martin Luther King Jr. fought to force white people to actually let black people vote.