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The God Ganesh - Hinduism - Ancient India
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The God Ganesh

Ganesh
Ganesh

Ganesh was one of the Hindu gods. He has an elephant head, so he's easy to spot in Indian art. Usually Ganesh also has a big belly and four arms. Sometimes Ganesh is dancing, or eating candy, or riding on a mouse. People in India first began to pray to Ganesh about 500 AD, during the Guptan period. Ganesh quickly became very popular, and came to be one of the main Hindu gods, though not as powerful or scary as Shiva or Vishnu.

Ganesh's name comes from two Sanskrit words, "isha", meaning "Lord", and "gana", meaning "group", so you might think of Ganesh as the god of sorting things out, or the god of many things. Nobody is quite sure what his name originally meant.


Another story about Ganesh

Most stories about Ganesh say that Ganesh was the son of Shiva and his wife Parvati. Ganesh was born looking like a boy and then when Ganesh interfered between his father Shiva and his mother Parvati, Shiva cut off Ganesh's head. To make up for this, Shiva gave Ganesh the head of an elephant.

Ganesh was the god of obstacles - things that get in your way. When Ganesh was a good god, he helped people by moving obstacles out of their way. For instance, he helped students get a scholarship so they could go to school. But when Ganesh was in a bad mood, or people were undeserving, he could also put obstacles in their way. People thought of Ganesh as especially the god of students, literature, and learning.

Learn by doing: a Hinduism project
More about Hinduism

Bibliography and further reading about Ganesh:

Hinduism
Ancient India
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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