What is Hubris? - Definition of Hubris
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What is Hubris?

Aegisthus murdering Agamemnon

Hubris (HOO-briss) is a Greek word which is sometimes translated into English as "pride" or "arrogance." (It is sometimes spelled hybris). Its original meaning in Greek was to hit something. It means thinking you are better than you really are, as in the expression "Pride goes before a fall." It especially means thinking you are better than the gods: gods hate that and you always come to a bad end.

Many myths warn people about the dangers of hubris, including the story of Arachne, the story of Agamemnon, and the story of Niobe. Hubris also plays a big part in the Iliad.
Some real-life stories where the Greeks thought hubris was to blame are Herodotus' story of Pisistratus the tyrant of Athens, and Herodotus' story of Xerxes in the Second Persian War.

Learn by doing: find examples of hubris in modern television shows
More about Niobe

Bibliography and further reading about hubris:

Law, Violence, and Community in Classical Athens, by David Cohen (P. A. Cartledge and Peter Garnsey are the editors) (1995). Cohen shows how agon (fighting) was the main idea behind the Greek court system.

Greek Ethics (Key Texts), by Pamela M. Huby (1998). Pretty easy to read, for an adult's book.

Philosophy and Science in Ancient Greece: The Pursuit of Knowledge, by Don Nardo (2004). For teenagers. Don Nardo has written many books for young people about the ancient Greeks.

More about Arachne
More about Niobe
Ancient Greece
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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