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Ancient Greek Pottery
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Ancient Greek Pottery

white mug with red squares
Stone Age cup from Sesklo (ca. 5000 BC)

Very few Greek painted pictures have survived the 2500 years since they were painted. So most of what we know about Greek art comes from the pictures they painted on fancy pottery. Pottery, even if it gets broken, can be put back together, and a lot of it has even survived whole, mostly in Etruscan tombs.

greek vase
Red figure Greek vase by
the Berlin Painter (Athens, ca. 500 BC)

Greek painted pottery changed a good deal over the five thousand years between the Stone Age and the Hellenistic period. For convenience, we divide it into seven different time periods. Click on each period to find out more.

Stone Age Greek Pottery
Early Bronze Age Greek Pottery
Late Bronze Age Greek Pottery
Sub-Mycenean Greek Pottery
Geometric Greek Pottery
Black-Figure Greek Pottery
Red-Figure Greek Pottery

Learn by doing: a vase-painting project
More about Greek art

Bibliography and further reading about Greek pottery:

A Greek Potter, by Giovanni Caselli (1986). A day in the life of a Greek potter, easy reading.

Hands-On Ancient People, Volume 2: Art Activities about Minoans, Mycenaeans, Trojans, Ancient Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans, by Yvonne Merrill (2004). Has a project for making your own Greek amphora.

The History of Greek Vases, by John Boardman (2001). For adults, but clear and readable, by an expert who has written most of the main books on Greek pottery.

Understanding Greek Vases: A Guide to Terms, Styles, and Techniques (Getty Museum Publications 2002) by Andrew J. Clark, Maya Elston, Mary Louise Hart.

Looking at Greek Vases, by Tom Rasmussen, Nigel Spivey (1991) (each chapter is written by a different specialist, but the book as a whole is intended for non-specialists).

More about Greek Art
Ancient Greece
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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