Where are the Appalachian Mountains?
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Appalachians

Appalachians
The Appalachians

December 2016 - About 300 million years ago, near the end of the Carboniferous period, when the first reptiles were evolving, the tectonic plates began to form the supercontinent of Pangaea. When the Euramerica continent smashed into Godwanaland, that pushed up the land to make the Appalachian mountains.

These Appalachian mountains are among the oldest mountains in the world. They have eroded over the years, so they aren't very high anymore, and they don't even have snow on them in the summertime. The Appalachians are about the same age as the Ural mountains that separate Asia from Europe, but they are far older than the Alps, the Himalayas, the Rockies, or even the Andes, which are the next oldest major mountains.

Learn by Doing - Graph the height of mountain chains
More about the Rocky Mountains

Bibliography and further reading about the Appalachian Mountains:

More about plate tectonics
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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