More Central Asia architecture - the Winter Palace answers questions

Central Asian Architecture

Winter Palace
Inside the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg

After 1500, architects in Central Asia divided into those who looked west, to Western Europe, for inspiration, those who looked south, to the Safavids and the Mughals, and those who looked east, to the Ch'ing Dynasty in China.

In the west, Russian czars and czarinas built palaces and cathedrals that competed with the palaces and cathedrals of Germany and Austria, and often were designed by German or Italian architects. The Winter Palace of St. Petersburg is a good example.

Temple in Mongolia
Amarbayasgalant Monastery, Mongolia (1700s AD)

Further east, the decline of the Silk Road meant that Central Asia became poorer. People continued to live in round yurts, as many still do today. They also built big stone lamasseries - places for lamas, or Buddhist monks, to live. The earliest lamasseries, in the 1500s and 1600s, were in the style of Chinese temples and palaces, but later ones were also influenced by local architecture - sometimes they looked like stone yurts - and by Indian and Tibetan styles.

Bibliography and further reading:

Main Central Asia page

Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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