Quantcast
Eggs - Eggs - When did animals and plants first develop eggs? What do you mean, plants have eggs?
Quatr.us answers questions
Upgrade /Log in
Options /Log out
Print
About
Africa
Egypt
Mesopotamia
Early Europe
Greece
Rome
China
India
Central Asia
Medieval
Islamic Empire
Native Americans
S./Central America
American History
Biology
Chemistry
Geology
Math
Physics
Weather
Food
Judaism
Christianity
Home

Eggs

Fish eggs
Fish eggs

The earliest living creatures made babies by dividing themselves in half, so that one cell became two cells. But by about ?? years ago, some creatures with more than one cell began to develop specialized cells that could combine with the cells from another creature to make a new creature. These were the first eggs.

As time went on, these creatures evolved into plants and animals, but both the plants and the animals continued to use specialized cells as eggs.

Robin's Nest
Robin's eggs

Reptiles began to lay eggs with hard shells made of calcium carbonate, a molecule combining carbon and calcium. Inside these shells, a baby reptile could grow safely until it was big enough to be born. Many animals, like snakes and birds, still lay hard eggs today.


Eggs hatching

About 200 million years ago, however, some reptiles evolved into mammals that kept their eggs inside them until the babies were big enough to be born. The earliest animals that kept their eggs inside them were the ancestors of the opossum.


Bibliography and further reading about animals:

Duck-billed Platypus
Mammals
Chordates
Biology
Chemistry
Math
Quatr.us home


Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

Help support Quatr.us!

Quatr.us (formerly "History for Kids") is entirely supported by your generous donations and by our sponsors. Most donors give about $10. Can you give $10 today to keep this site running? Or give $50 to sponsor a page?

And now it's already Mardi Gras! The day after Mardi Gras is Ash Wednesday, the first day of the Christian holy days of Lent. Lent marks the last hungry days before new food starts growing in the spring. The end of Lent is Easter, remembering Jesus and the Resurrection. Easter's descended from earlier spring holidays like the Zoroastrian Nowruz, and the Jewish Passover.